Pendulum Quartz Clock Movement QU3

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Chiming Pendulum Quartz Clock Movements - Replace, or improve an existing pendulum quartz clock. Or build your own clock creation. - Clockworks 
Chiming QuartzAssembly DiagramMovement RemovalQuartz InstallationMovement MeasuringMeasuring Post LengthsDefinitions
Please view these information tabs to learn more Info about Chiming Quartz Movements

Quartz Clock Movement Removal

This note explains quartz clock movement removal from the case. The following does not apply to quartz units made in Germany or inserts. To remove the movement, need access to the back of the clock and the front side of the clock dial. There are so many case designs it would not be possible to cover all of the different variations. The clock case went to together so it comes apart. It may take a bit of probing but there is always a way to take it apart because it went together.

Getting access to the dial area

There are many case designs and styles and there is no way for us to know how the current specific clock went together. Most of the time the removal process is very easy but of course there are some instances where it is not user friendly. Thus, it is on the users end to be able to access the dial and movement area to continue with the swap out.

Clock hand removal

Quartz clock movement removal always needs the hands to come off first. There are two reasons for this. First, need to have access to the hardware that mounts the movement. Second, there is no way to take get the movement out of the clock if the hands are still on it. They certainly will not fit through the hole in the clock.

Quartz Clock Movement Removal - Minute hand

Quartz clock movements have two styles of minute hands. One style has a nut that holds it in place and the other style is a friction fit. The friction fit has no nut and just pulls off with a twist and pull. The second style has a minute hand nut to secure the minute hand. Removal is done by turning the nut to the left with needle nose pliers. Once the nut is loose it only requires fingers to unscrew it.

Hour hand

In a Quartz clock Movement removal task, the hour hand is only a friction fit. Thus, the hour tube tapers down on the movement, meaning it is wider on the low end of it. This makes the hour hand friction fit only. Just twist the hand and pull it until it comes off.

Second hand

The second hand pulls straight up and off if the clock has one.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020
Clock Dial

Quartz clock movement installation

In essence, this is a quick step by step practical guide for the quartz clock movement installation. The first step is to get the old unit out of the way. Of course, this is done by removing the hands from the clock.

Then remove the hex nut that is on the post where the hands were. In essence, the movement will fall out the back of the clock dial. On occasion, the movement will have glue holding it in place. So, if this is the case, very gently pry the movement off of the back of the clock with a screwdriver. Now it is out of the way and installation of the new quartz clock movement bought from Clockworks can be done. Likewise, Quartz clock movement installation is usually very easy. Altogether, these are the assembly instructions for the time only quartz clock movement into the clock case.

Sequential order of installation

  • 1. Place the steel hanger over the threaded post (optional)
  • 2. Place black rubber washer on the post next (optional)
  • 3. Start mounting the movement by putting the post through the dial
  • 4. Then on the front of the dial, slide the brass washer onto the post of the movement.
  • 5. Put the hex nut on post and tighten so it holds the movement to the back of the clock face.
  • 6. Push hour hand on the post by friction fit
  • 7. Put the minute hand on the post
  • 8. If using a second screw the doughnut on to hold the minute hand in place. Then install the second hand now by friction fit. The post just sticks onto the pin at the end of the post.
  • 9. If not using a second hand just secure the minute hand with the pretty cap nut.

The movement installation is now complete

Naturally, this applies to all battery operated clock movements available on Clockworks. For example, chiming quartz, time only, and high torque. Of course, the exception to this would be clock inserts.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Quartz clock movement measuring

Please select the post length when ordering a new quartz clock movement. Of course, when doing quartz clock movement measuring, remember the post will need to be able to go through the thickness of the dial face. Also remember that the dial may or may not have a wood backing to it. With a wood backing the clock dial or face would be thicker and thus would need a longer post. Clockworks offers multiple post lengths on quartz clock movements for this reason. In other words, the post has to be long enough to go through whatever thickness we are calling the dial.

How to measure quartz clock movement post

What to measure

Clockworks offers multiple post lengths for quartz movements. When completing a quartz clock movement measurement, you will need to measure the post on the old movement. This is so it can match up with the new quartz movement. To clarify, the post is the part that goes through the dial (face) and mounts from the front and what is in a quartz clock movement measurement. This applies to all Clockworks quartz movements, including chiming quartz, and time only quartz movements.

Length depends on dial thickness

When working on a quartz clock movement measurement the post has to be long enough to go through whatever thickness that the clock face/dial, might be. The length of the threaded portion of the post/shaft, is the measurement needed. The threaded shaft needs to go through the dial/face of the clock from the back to the front. It needs to be long enough for a small hex nut to screw onto it. It can’t be too long or the hands will not move correctly. Clockworks has a variety of quartz clock movement lengths to accommodate a variety of different materials since some are wood and some are metal and some are plastic, etc.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Measuring quartz post lengths

Above all, when replacing a quartz movement it means measuring quartz post lengths. Subsequently, the post will stick out through the front of the clock dial. Of course, there needs to be enough threads sticking out for the hex nut to be put on. Hence, the movement will be held in place to the back of the dial (clock face) and will not move. Sometimes if the clock has glass over the face it is possible for the post to hit it. Therefore it is important to measure the quartz post length correctly. In other words, if the post hits the glass, the hands will not be able to move. Thus making the clock not work.

Use the chart if building a clock

With that being said, find the correct quartz post length by using the chart below. So remember, the threads on the post need to be at least 2/16 longer than the thickness of the clock dial. To clarify, a clock dial is the face (also called the thing with the numbers on it). As always, email us if there is any question.

Measuring quartz post lengths if replacing a clock

If replacing a movement and not building a clock, it is easier to measure the quartz post length of the old movement. Before measuring, remove the movement first by taking off the hands and then the hex nut. Next, measure the length of the post that has the threads that the hex nut was on. In short, only measure the fat part of the hand shaft that we call a post. Also, never include the part that the hands go on when measuring the post length. All in all, the new unit needs to be the same post length as the old movement. Overall, this applies to all quartz clock movements available on Clockworks such as chiming quartz and time only quartz.

Dial Thickness

  • 1/16 inch thick
  • 3/16 inch thick
  • 5/16 inch thick
  • 9/16 inch thick
  • 3/4 inch thick

Size Post Needed

  • 3/16"
  • 5/16"
  • 7/16"
  • 11/16"
  • 15/16"
How to measure quartz clock movement post
The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Pendulum Quartz Clock Movement

Time and pendulum quartz clock movement, pendulum and hands sold separate. This is a strong unit that can run hands up to 11 inches long. This length is based on the minute hand length from the mounting hole to the end. It can run a pendulum length of 16 inches providing it is light weight. We do offer a pendulum with 3 bob diameter options, sold separately. Please note the old hands may not fit the new movement, it is best to get new hands with the new movement. These are also sold separately and come as a pair. This time and pendulum quartz clock movement will can come with the pendulum if selected. The pendulum is 16 inches (406mm) at its total length, however this can be shortened. The back of the pendulum rod has notches each inch up the rod, so all that is required is to bend and snap at the desired length.

May need new hands for the clock movement

The old hands will usually work on the new pendulum quartz unit. However there are some instances where they will not. If the old unit has an hour and minute hand both with round mounting holes, they will not fit the new movement. It is best just to get the new hands either way so it does not have too be a concern. They are sold as a pair but only the minute hand is measured. The minute hand is measured from the mounting hole to the end.
Pendulum Quartz Clock Movements

About the pendulum

To replace a pendulum quartz clock movement, the threaded post that the hex nut screws onto will need to be measured. This is the wide post the 6 sided nut screws onto only. The section that the hands mount too will extend beyond this measurement by 1/4 inch.
Pendulum Quartz Clock Movements

Pendulum Quartz Clock Movement

Dial Thickness

  • 1/16 inch thick
  • 3/16 inch thick
  • 5/16 inch thick
  • 9/16 inch thick
  • 3/4 inch thick

Size Post Needed

  • 3/16"
  • 5/16"
  • 7/16"
  • 11/16"
  • 15/16"

Movement

Time and pendulum quartz clock movement with a 16 inch pendulum that can be shorted to whatever less length.

Hands

Any of the hands Clockworks offers for quartz clock movements will fit this unit. The hour hand will have a round hole and the minute hand would have a oblong hole. The hour hand goes on as a friction fit, then the minute hand goes on the upper post with its nut. A second hand can be used only if its wanted. All hands are sold separately and is offered here as well.

Pendulum

Offered with this movement is a pendulum that is 16 inches at its longest. However it can be shortened to anything less than 16 inches with ease. The pendulum has three bob diameter options to choose from, the bob is the round disk at the bottom of the pendulum rod. Please note although this is a pendulum unit, it can be used with or without the pendulum. If a pendulum is not used, you can just lock the pendulum swinger to one side and not use it. Keep in mind the time and pendulum quartz clock movement, pendulum and hands sold separate.

Mounting Post

The movements threaded post comes in three lengths. This is the fat threaded part that takes the hex nut. This post length is what we measure, the actual part that the hands go onto sticks out another ¼ inch beyond this measurement, but we do not count that in the measurement. There are many post lengths available for this unit. The posts are all 5/16 wide and fits through a ⅜ wide dial hole.

Features

  • Step motion
  • Second hand optional
  • Optional 16 inch Pendulum
  • Takes one AA Battery

Instructions

  1. Mount movement to the dial with provided hardware
  2. Hang the pendulum
  3. Install the hands with included hardware
  4. Insert AA battery into the movement

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Heavy-Duty Clock Pendulum Drive

Posted on    Posted in  turned_in_not  
Chiming Pendulum Quartz Clock Movements - Replace, or improve an existing pendulum quartz clock. Or build your own clock creation. - Clockworks 
Chiming QuartzAssembly DiagramMovement RemovalQuartz InstallationMovement MeasuringMeasuring Post LengthsDefinitions
Please view these information tabs to learn more Info about Chiming Quartz Movements

Quartz Clock Movement Removal

This note explains quartz clock movement removal from the case. The following does not apply to quartz units made in Germany or inserts. To remove the movement, need access to the back of the clock and the front side of the clock dial. There are so many case designs it would not be possible to cover all of the different variations. The clock case went to together so it comes apart. It may take a bit of probing but there is always a way to take it apart because it went together.

Getting access to the dial area

There are many case designs and styles and there is no way for us to know how the current specific clock went together. Most of the time the removal process is very easy but of course there are some instances where it is not user friendly. Thus, it is on the users end to be able to access the dial and movement area to continue with the swap out.

Clock hand removal

Quartz clock movement removal always needs the hands to come off first. There are two reasons for this. First, need to have access to the hardware that mounts the movement. Second, there is no way to take get the movement out of the clock if the hands are still on it. They certainly will not fit through the hole in the clock.

Quartz Clock Movement Removal - Minute hand

Quartz clock movements have two styles of minute hands. One style has a nut that holds it in place and the other style is a friction fit. The friction fit has no nut and just pulls off with a twist and pull. The second style has a minute hand nut to secure the minute hand. Removal is done by turning the nut to the left with needle nose pliers. Once the nut is loose it only requires fingers to unscrew it.

Hour hand

In a Quartz clock Movement removal task, the hour hand is only a friction fit. Thus, the hour tube tapers down on the movement, meaning it is wider on the low end of it. This makes the hour hand friction fit only. Just twist the hand and pull it until it comes off.

Second hand

The second hand pulls straight up and off if the clock has one.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020
Clock Dial

Quartz clock movement installation

In essence, this is a quick step by step practical guide for the quartz clock movement installation. The first step is to get the old unit out of the way. Of course, this is done by removing the hands from the clock.

Then remove the hex nut that is on the post where the hands were. In essence, the movement will fall out the back of the clock dial. On occasion, the movement will have glue holding it in place. So, if this is the case, very gently pry the movement off of the back of the clock with a screwdriver. Now it is out of the way and installation of the new quartz clock movement bought from Clockworks can be done. Likewise, Quartz clock movement installation is usually very easy. Altogether, these are the assembly instructions for the time only quartz clock movement into the clock case.

Sequential order of installation

  • 1. Place the steel hanger over the threaded post (optional)
  • 2. Place black rubber washer on the post next (optional)
  • 3. Start mounting the movement by putting the post through the dial
  • 4. Then on the front of the dial, slide the brass washer onto the post of the movement.
  • 5. Put the hex nut on post and tighten so it holds the movement to the back of the clock face.
  • 6. Push hour hand on the post by friction fit
  • 7. Put the minute hand on the post
  • 8. If using a second screw the doughnut on to hold the minute hand in place. Then install the second hand now by friction fit. The post just sticks onto the pin at the end of the post.
  • 9. If not using a second hand just secure the minute hand with the pretty cap nut.

The movement installation is now complete

Naturally, this applies to all battery operated clock movements available on Clockworks. For example, chiming quartz, time only, and high torque. Of course, the exception to this would be clock inserts.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Quartz clock movement measuring

Please select the post length when ordering a new quartz clock movement. Of course, when doing quartz clock movement measuring, remember the post will need to be able to go through the thickness of the dial face. Also remember that the dial may or may not have a wood backing to it. With a wood backing the clock dial or face would be thicker and thus would need a longer post. Clockworks offers multiple post lengths on quartz clock movements for this reason. In other words, the post has to be long enough to go through whatever thickness we are calling the dial.

How to measure quartz clock movement post

What to measure

Clockworks offers multiple post lengths for quartz movements. When completing a quartz clock movement measurement, you will need to measure the post on the old movement. This is so it can match up with the new quartz movement. To clarify, the post is the part that goes through the dial (face) and mounts from the front and what is in a quartz clock movement measurement. This applies to all Clockworks quartz movements, including chiming quartz, and time only quartz movements.

Length depends on dial thickness

When working on a quartz clock movement measurement the post has to be long enough to go through whatever thickness that the clock face/dial, might be. The length of the threaded portion of the post/shaft, is the measurement needed. The threaded shaft needs to go through the dial/face of the clock from the back to the front. It needs to be long enough for a small hex nut to screw onto it. It can’t be too long or the hands will not move correctly. Clockworks has a variety of quartz clock movement lengths to accommodate a variety of different materials since some are wood and some are metal and some are plastic, etc.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Measuring quartz post lengths

Above all, when replacing a quartz movement it means measuring quartz post lengths. Subsequently, the post will stick out through the front of the clock dial. Of course, there needs to be enough threads sticking out for the hex nut to be put on. Hence, the movement will be held in place to the back of the dial (clock face) and will not move. Sometimes if the clock has glass over the face it is possible for the post to hit it. Therefore it is important to measure the quartz post length correctly. In other words, if the post hits the glass, the hands will not be able to move. Thus making the clock not work.

Use the chart if building a clock

With that being said, find the correct quartz post length by using the chart below. So remember, the threads on the post need to be at least 2/16 longer than the thickness of the clock dial. To clarify, a clock dial is the face (also called the thing with the numbers on it). As always, email us if there is any question.

Measuring quartz post lengths if replacing a clock

If replacing a movement and not building a clock, it is easier to measure the quartz post length of the old movement. Before measuring, remove the movement first by taking off the hands and then the hex nut. Next, measure the length of the post that has the threads that the hex nut was on. In short, only measure the fat part of the hand shaft that we call a post. Also, never include the part that the hands go on when measuring the post length. All in all, the new unit needs to be the same post length as the old movement. Overall, this applies to all quartz clock movements available on Clockworks such as chiming quartz and time only quartz.

Dial Thickness

  • 1/16 inch thick
  • 3/16 inch thick
  • 5/16 inch thick
  • 9/16 inch thick
  • 3/4 inch thick

Size Post Needed

  • 3/16"
  • 5/16"
  • 7/16"
  • 11/16"
  • 15/16"
How to measure quartz clock movement post
The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Heavy-Duty Clock Pendulum Drive

The pendulum drive is a heavy-duty battery unit that can swing any mechanical clock pendulum. Uses only two C cell batteries and is very strong. It test ran fine with the largest metal pendulum produced in the modern world with added weight, swung no problem. The main swinger part measures 5 1/2" x 2 5/8" x 2".


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Premium Chime Clock Movement QU40

Posted on    Posted in  turned_in_not  
Chiming Pendulum Quartz Clock Movements - Replace, or improve an existing pendulum quartz clock. Or build your own clock creation. - Clockworks 
Chiming QuartzAssembly DiagramMovement RemovalQuartz InstallationMovement MeasuringMeasuring Post LengthsDefinitions
Please view these information tabs to learn more Info about Chiming Quartz Movements

Quartz Clock Movement Removal

This note explains quartz clock movement removal from the case. The following does not apply to quartz units made in Germany or inserts. To remove the movement, need access to the back of the clock and the front side of the clock dial. There are so many case designs it would not be possible to cover all of the different variations. The clock case went to together so it comes apart. It may take a bit of probing but there is always a way to take it apart because it went together.

Getting access to the dial area

There are many case designs and styles and there is no way for us to know how the current specific clock went together. Most of the time the removal process is very easy but of course there are some instances where it is not user friendly. Thus, it is on the users end to be able to access the dial and movement area to continue with the swap out.

Clock hand removal

Quartz clock movement removal always needs the hands to come off first. There are two reasons for this. First, need to have access to the hardware that mounts the movement. Second, there is no way to take get the movement out of the clock if the hands are still on it. They certainly will not fit through the hole in the clock.

Quartz Clock Movement Removal - Minute hand

Quartz clock movements have two styles of minute hands. One style has a nut that holds it in place and the other style is a friction fit. The friction fit has no nut and just pulls off with a twist and pull. The second style has a minute hand nut to secure the minute hand. Removal is done by turning the nut to the left with needle nose pliers. Once the nut is loose it only requires fingers to unscrew it.

Hour hand

In a Quartz clock Movement removal task, the hour hand is only a friction fit. Thus, the hour tube tapers down on the movement, meaning it is wider on the low end of it. This makes the hour hand friction fit only. Just twist the hand and pull it until it comes off.

Second hand

The second hand pulls straight up and off if the clock has one.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020
Clock Dial

Quartz clock movement installation

In essence, this is a quick step by step practical guide for the quartz clock movement installation. The first step is to get the old unit out of the way. Of course, this is done by removing the hands from the clock.

Then remove the hex nut that is on the post where the hands were. In essence, the movement will fall out the back of the clock dial. On occasion, the movement will have glue holding it in place. So, if this is the case, very gently pry the movement off of the back of the clock with a screwdriver. Now it is out of the way and installation of the new quartz clock movement bought from Clockworks can be done. Likewise, Quartz clock movement installation is usually very easy. Altogether, these are the assembly instructions for the time only quartz clock movement into the clock case.

Sequential order of installation

  • 1. Place the steel hanger over the threaded post (optional)
  • 2. Place black rubber washer on the post next (optional)
  • 3. Start mounting the movement by putting the post through the dial
  • 4. Then on the front of the dial, slide the brass washer onto the post of the movement.
  • 5. Put the hex nut on post and tighten so it holds the movement to the back of the clock face.
  • 6. Push hour hand on the post by friction fit
  • 7. Put the minute hand on the post
  • 8. If using a second screw the doughnut on to hold the minute hand in place. Then install the second hand now by friction fit. The post just sticks onto the pin at the end of the post.
  • 9. If not using a second hand just secure the minute hand with the pretty cap nut.

The movement installation is now complete

Naturally, this applies to all battery operated clock movements available on Clockworks. For example, chiming quartz, time only, and high torque. Of course, the exception to this would be clock inserts.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Quartz clock movement measuring

Please select the post length when ordering a new quartz clock movement. Of course, when doing quartz clock movement measuring, remember the post will need to be able to go through the thickness of the dial face. Also remember that the dial may or may not have a wood backing to it. With a wood backing the clock dial or face would be thicker and thus would need a longer post. Clockworks offers multiple post lengths on quartz clock movements for this reason. In other words, the post has to be long enough to go through whatever thickness we are calling the dial.

How to measure quartz clock movement post

What to measure

Clockworks offers multiple post lengths for quartz movements. When completing a quartz clock movement measurement, you will need to measure the post on the old movement. This is so it can match up with the new quartz movement. To clarify, the post is the part that goes through the dial (face) and mounts from the front and what is in a quartz clock movement measurement. This applies to all Clockworks quartz movements, including chiming quartz, and time only quartz movements.

Length depends on dial thickness

When working on a quartz clock movement measurement the post has to be long enough to go through whatever thickness that the clock face/dial, might be. The length of the threaded portion of the post/shaft, is the measurement needed. The threaded shaft needs to go through the dial/face of the clock from the back to the front. It needs to be long enough for a small hex nut to screw onto it. It can’t be too long or the hands will not move correctly. Clockworks has a variety of quartz clock movement lengths to accommodate a variety of different materials since some are wood and some are metal and some are plastic, etc.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Measuring quartz post lengths

Above all, when replacing a quartz movement it means measuring quartz post lengths. Subsequently, the post will stick out through the front of the clock dial. Of course, there needs to be enough threads sticking out for the hex nut to be put on. Hence, the movement will be held in place to the back of the dial (clock face) and will not move. Sometimes if the clock has glass over the face it is possible for the post to hit it. Therefore it is important to measure the quartz post length correctly. In other words, if the post hits the glass, the hands will not be able to move. Thus making the clock not work.

Use the chart if building a clock

With that being said, find the correct quartz post length by using the chart below. So remember, the threads on the post need to be at least 2/16 longer than the thickness of the clock dial. To clarify, a clock dial is the face (also called the thing with the numbers on it). As always, email us if there is any question.

Measuring quartz post lengths if replacing a clock

If replacing a movement and not building a clock, it is easier to measure the quartz post length of the old movement. Before measuring, remove the movement first by taking off the hands and then the hex nut. Next, measure the length of the post that has the threads that the hex nut was on. In short, only measure the fat part of the hand shaft that we call a post. Also, never include the part that the hands go on when measuring the post length. All in all, the new unit needs to be the same post length as the old movement. Overall, this applies to all quartz clock movements available on Clockworks such as chiming quartz and time only quartz.

Dial Thickness

  • 1/16 inch thick
  • 3/16 inch thick
  • 5/16 inch thick
  • 9/16 inch thick
  • 3/4 inch thick

Size Post Needed

  • 3/16"
  • 5/16"
  • 7/16"
  • 11/16"
  • 15/16"
How to measure quartz clock movement post
The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Premium Chime Clock Movement

This QU40 is a premium chime clock movement that has a four melody chime. In addition, this unit is unique as it has a light sensor. If the lights are off, or it does not see light, it will not chime. Of course there is an overnight automatic shut off that is an option as well. Moreover, the clock hands and the second hand are sold separately.

Premium Chime Clock Movement QU40 Sounds like a mechanical clock

With our one year warranty and their amazing Tubular Chime sound, these movements should provide years of worry free performance. This unit has a premium sound quality and takes two C-cell batteries. Also, the speaker is on a wire so it can mount anywhere in the clock case with two wood screws.
Premium Chime Clock Movement When replacing please measure the post on the old unit, so it can match up with a new chiming quartz movement. To clarify, the post is the part that goes through the dial (face) and mounts from the front.
Chiming quartz clock movement with the best sound by Clockworks

Premium Chime Clock Movement

Assistance = 800-381-7458

Dial Thickness

  • 1/16 inch thick
  • 3/16 inch thick
  • 5/16 inch thick
  • 9/16 inch thick
  • 3/4 inch thick

Needs this Post Length

  • 3/16"
  • 5/16"
  • 7/16"
  • 11/16"
  • 15/16"


  • Volume control
  • 16 inch pendulum at longest
  • AutoNight Silence Switch
  • Light sensor for chime off
  • 4 9/16" x 4 3/4" x 1 1/8"

Premium Chime Clock Movement QU40 Movement

The new QU40 quartz movement has step motion timekeeping accuracy and includes a time setting knob on the back of the unit. Additionally, the knob on the back is so the time can be set by the back, in case the hands are not easily accessible from the front. This is a pendulum unit however it will run with or without the pendulum. In other words, the pendulum motion does not have anything to do with the timekeeping on this unit.

Sound

This is the only unit with four options for the chime. Choose between Westminster chime on every quarter and then striking out the hour, or choose Westminster or Ave Maria or BimBam on the top of the hour only. The light sensor is easy, if it does not see light, it will not make noise. Thus, the sensor is on a wire so it can tuck in where it can detect if there is light or not. This can be anywhere in the case that light would fall upon.

Hands

Any of the hands we sell for quartz clock movements will fit this unit. As far as the quartz units go, we only have the standard American “I” shaft units and hands. Specifically, this means the hour hand will have a round hole and the minute hand would have a oblong hole. Additionally the hour hand goes on as a friction fit, then the minute hand goes on the upper post with its nut. Similarly, use a second hand only if you want to. This is an optional feature. Furthermore, all hands are sold separately and are offered here as well.

Pendulum

This movement has an optional pendulum that is 16 inches at its longest, starting at $6.00. However it can be shortened to anything less than 16 inches with ease. In fact, the pendulum has three bob diameter options to choose from. The bob is the round disk at the bottom of the pendulum rod. Please note although this is a pendulum unit, it can be used with or without the pendulum. Likewise, if a pendulum is not in use, lock the pendulum swinger to one side if you do not want it to swing.

Mounting Post

Also, the movements threaded post comes in three lengths. This is the fat threaded part that takes the hex nut. To clarify, the length of the threads on the post is what we measure. Of course, the actual part that the hands go onto sticks out another ¼ inch beyond this measurement, but we do not count that in the measurement. So the post lengths available for this unit are either 5/16 long or 7/16 or 11/16 long. Comparatively, the posts are all 5/16 wide, and fit into a ⅜ dial hole.
Chiming Quartz Instructions QU40

Features

  • Westminster every quarter, and then strike out the hours
  • Or Westminster / Ave Maria / BimBam on the top of the hour only
  • Auto Night Silence Option (10pm to 6am)
  • Volume Control
  • Second Hand Option
  • Pendulum Option
  • Light sensor auto chime off
  • Takes Two C Cell Batteries

Premium Chime Clock Movement QU40 Instructions

  1. Connect the speaker to the movement
  2. Rotate handshaft clockwise until you hear a faint click sound. Then install hands at 5:00
  3. Insert the proper C-cell batteries into the movement. Note that the positive end of the battery faces downward.
  4. Double check to see that the hands are at the 5:00 position. Then press the gray RESET button at the bottom of the back side of the movement. This will set the electronic strike to 5:00AM. Rotate hands to 6:00 and note that it will strike 6 times. If everything is correct advance the hands to the correct time.
  5. Next, choose the melody in which you wish the movement to play. Note when in the 4x4 mode it will chime on the quarter and half hours as well as on the hour.
  6. When in the 4x4 mode, it may take a complete hour to correct itself after the time set knob is turned to the correct hour. However this is completely normal.
  7. For night chime silence, set the sound lever located on the back right hand side to PM 11:00-AM 5:45 Night off. This will be the auto night shut off mode and will shut the chimes off between 11 and 5:45AM. For 24 hours, move lever to the 24HR mode.
  8. The MONITOR button is used to demonstrate the hourly chime.
  9. The SET button is used to advance the strike one hour. However, this will not move the hands
  10. Very Important! Never turn the hands backwards. If setting the time from the back of the clock, turn the time set knob on the back of the movement so the hands move Clockwise only. Likewise, if setting the clock from the front, turn hands Clockwise only.

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Seiko Chiming Clock Movement

Posted on    Posted in  turned_in_not  
Chiming Pendulum Quartz Clock Movements - Replace, or improve an existing pendulum quartz clock. Or build your own clock creation. - Clockworks 
Chiming QuartzAssembly DiagramMovement RemovalQuartz InstallationMovement MeasuringMeasuring Post LengthsDefinitions
Please view these information tabs to learn more Info about Chiming Quartz Movements

Quartz Clock Movement Removal

This note explains quartz clock movement removal from the case. The following does not apply to quartz units made in Germany or inserts. To remove the movement, need access to the back of the clock and the front side of the clock dial. There are so many case designs it would not be possible to cover all of the different variations. The clock case went to together so it comes apart. It may take a bit of probing but there is always a way to take it apart because it went together.

Getting access to the dial area

There are many case designs and styles and there is no way for us to know how the current specific clock went together. Most of the time the removal process is very easy but of course there are some instances where it is not user friendly. Thus, it is on the users end to be able to access the dial and movement area to continue with the swap out.

Clock hand removal

Quartz clock movement removal always needs the hands to come off first. There are two reasons for this. First, need to have access to the hardware that mounts the movement. Second, there is no way to take get the movement out of the clock if the hands are still on it. They certainly will not fit through the hole in the clock.

Quartz Clock Movement Removal - Minute hand

Quartz clock movements have two styles of minute hands. One style has a nut that holds it in place and the other style is a friction fit. The friction fit has no nut and just pulls off with a twist and pull. The second style has a minute hand nut to secure the minute hand. Removal is done by turning the nut to the left with needle nose pliers. Once the nut is loose it only requires fingers to unscrew it.

Hour hand

In a Quartz clock Movement removal task, the hour hand is only a friction fit. Thus, the hour tube tapers down on the movement, meaning it is wider on the low end of it. This makes the hour hand friction fit only. Just twist the hand and pull it until it comes off.

Second hand

The second hand pulls straight up and off if the clock has one.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020
Clock Dial

Quartz clock movement installation

In essence, this is a quick step by step practical guide for the quartz clock movement installation. The first step is to get the old unit out of the way. Of course, this is done by removing the hands from the clock.

Then remove the hex nut that is on the post where the hands were. In essence, the movement will fall out the back of the clock dial. On occasion, the movement will have glue holding it in place. So, if this is the case, very gently pry the movement off of the back of the clock with a screwdriver. Now it is out of the way and installation of the new quartz clock movement bought from Clockworks can be done. Likewise, Quartz clock movement installation is usually very easy. Altogether, these are the assembly instructions for the time only quartz clock movement into the clock case.

Sequential order of installation

  • 1. Place the steel hanger over the threaded post (optional)
  • 2. Place black rubber washer on the post next (optional)
  • 3. Start mounting the movement by putting the post through the dial
  • 4. Then on the front of the dial, slide the brass washer onto the post of the movement.
  • 5. Put the hex nut on post and tighten so it holds the movement to the back of the clock face.
  • 6. Push hour hand on the post by friction fit
  • 7. Put the minute hand on the post
  • 8. If using a second screw the doughnut on to hold the minute hand in place. Then install the second hand now by friction fit. The post just sticks onto the pin at the end of the post.
  • 9. If not using a second hand just secure the minute hand with the pretty cap nut.

The movement installation is now complete

Naturally, this applies to all battery operated clock movements available on Clockworks. For example, chiming quartz, time only, and high torque. Of course, the exception to this would be clock inserts.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Quartz clock movement measuring

Please select the post length when ordering a new quartz clock movement. Of course, when doing quartz clock movement measuring, remember the post will need to be able to go through the thickness of the dial face. Also remember that the dial may or may not have a wood backing to it. With a wood backing the clock dial or face would be thicker and thus would need a longer post. Clockworks offers multiple post lengths on quartz clock movements for this reason. In other words, the post has to be long enough to go through whatever thickness we are calling the dial.

How to measure quartz clock movement post

What to measure

Clockworks offers multiple post lengths for quartz movements. When completing a quartz clock movement measurement, you will need to measure the post on the old movement. This is so it can match up with the new quartz movement. To clarify, the post is the part that goes through the dial (face) and mounts from the front and what is in a quartz clock movement measurement. This applies to all Clockworks quartz movements, including chiming quartz, and time only quartz movements.

Length depends on dial thickness

When working on a quartz clock movement measurement the post has to be long enough to go through whatever thickness that the clock face/dial, might be. The length of the threaded portion of the post/shaft, is the measurement needed. The threaded shaft needs to go through the dial/face of the clock from the back to the front. It needs to be long enough for a small hex nut to screw onto it. It can’t be too long or the hands will not move correctly. Clockworks has a variety of quartz clock movement lengths to accommodate a variety of different materials since some are wood and some are metal and some are plastic, etc.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Measuring quartz post lengths

Above all, when replacing a quartz movement it means measuring quartz post lengths. Subsequently, the post will stick out through the front of the clock dial. Of course, there needs to be enough threads sticking out for the hex nut to be put on. Hence, the movement will be held in place to the back of the dial (clock face) and will not move. Sometimes if the clock has glass over the face it is possible for the post to hit it. Therefore it is important to measure the quartz post length correctly. In other words, if the post hits the glass, the hands will not be able to move. Thus making the clock not work.

Use the chart if building a clock

With that being said, find the correct quartz post length by using the chart below. So remember, the threads on the post need to be at least 2/16 longer than the thickness of the clock dial. To clarify, a clock dial is the face (also called the thing with the numbers on it). As always, email us if there is any question.

Measuring quartz post lengths if replacing a clock

If replacing a movement and not building a clock, it is easier to measure the quartz post length of the old movement. Before measuring, remove the movement first by taking off the hands and then the hex nut. Next, measure the length of the post that has the threads that the hex nut was on. In short, only measure the fat part of the hand shaft that we call a post. Also, never include the part that the hands go on when measuring the post length. All in all, the new unit needs to be the same post length as the old movement. Overall, this applies to all quartz clock movements available on Clockworks such as chiming quartz and time only quartz.

Dial Thickness

  • 1/16 inch thick
  • 3/16 inch thick
  • 5/16 inch thick
  • 9/16 inch thick
  • 3/4 inch thick

Size Post Needed

  • 3/16"
  • 5/16"
  • 7/16"
  • 11/16"
  • 15/16"
How to measure quartz clock movement post
The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Seiko Chiming Clock Movement

Seiko durability in a quartz chiming clock movement. Plays choice of Westminster or Whittington on the quarters and then strike out the hours. Has an auto night feature if the chimes are not wanted at night. If set, it will not chime between 10pm and 6am. The clock hands and the second hand are sold separately.

Pendulum or Non

The most compact chime pendulum unit offered here at Clockworks with 3 1/4" x 5 1/4" x 1 5/16" for measurements. Offering both the pendulum version and the non pendulum version. Of course the pendulum has nothing to do with the time keeping and is just for looks.
Chiming Quartz Clock MovementWhen replacing a clock movement please measure the post on the old unit, so it can be matched up with the new chiming quartz movement. The post is the part that goes through the dial (face) and mounts from the front.

Seiko Chime Sounds

Westminster Chime Whittington Chime
Chiming quartz clock movement with the best sound by clockworks.com

Seiko Chiming Quartz Clock Movements

Assistance = 800-381-7458

Dial Thickness

  • 1/16 inch thick
  • 3/16 inch thick
  • 5/16 inch thick
  • 9/16 inch thick
  • 3/4 inch thick

Size Post Needed

  • 3/16"
  • 5/16"
  • 7/16"
  • 11/16"
  • 15/16"

Features

  • Westminster or Whittington and then strike out the hourly count
  • Auto Night Silence Option (10pm to 6am)
  • Volume Control
  • Second Hand Option
  • Pendulum Option
  • Takes one C Battery

Movement

The Seiko Chiming Quartz Clock Movement is the most durable we have to offer and has the fewest returns

Sound

The unit can be set to play either Westminster or Whittington chime. It will chime on the quarter hours and then strike out the hour on the top of each hour. There is a volume control and also there is a optional auto night silence switch for night silence.

Hands

Any of the quartz hands offered for quartz clock movements will fit this unit. The hour hand will have a round hole and the minute hand would have a oblong hole. The hour hand goes on as a friction fit, then the minute hand goes on the upper post with its nut. A second hand can be used only if its wanted. All hands are sold separately and is offered here as well.

Pendulum

This movement comes with a free pendulum that is 16 inches at its longest. However it can be shortened to anything less than 16 inches with ease. The pendulum has three bob diameter options to choose from, the bob is the round disk at the bottom of the pendulum rod. Please note although this is a pendulum unit, it can be used with or without the pendulum. If a pendulum is not used the pendulum swinger can be locked to one side and not use it.

Mounting Post

The Seiko movements threaded post comes in two lengths. This is the wide threaded part that takes the hex nut. This post length is what we measure, the actual part that the hands go onto sticks out another ¼ inch beyond this measurement, but we do not count that in the measurement. The post lengths available for this unit is either 5/16 long or 11/16 long. The posts are all 5/16 wide, and fit into a ⅜ dial hole.

QU30 Chiming Seiko Instructions

The following are the QU30 Chiming Seiko Instructions.

Please Note: The movement will not chime the quarter hours while the time is being set. Only the hourly chimes will operate during the setup process. The quarters will start when the clock is set and about 90 minutes after being left alone to chime on its own.

  1. Push the HOUR hand onto the post at the 6 o'clock position.
  2. Place the MINUTE hand at 12 o'clock and tighten the minute hand nut.
  3. Press the SECOND hand onto the shaft at the 12 o'clock position (if using one). Hands are now set to the CHIME of the motor.
  4. Using the hand setter, on the upper right side of the movement, turn the hands clockwise to the correct time of day.
  5. Insert one C-cell battery. The motor will now run and set for the correct chime and time of day.
  6. To listen to 24 hour chime and strike, place the AM / PM switch in the LEFT position. For night-time silence (between hours of 11:00PM and 5:45AM) place the AM / PM switch in the RIGHT position.
  7. The song switch on the left side of the movement is to select Westminster or Whittington. The display shows a 1 or 2. Slide the switch to whatever song wanted.
  8. This concludes the QU30 Chiming Seiko Instructions. Now the clock is properly set up.

Making it chime on time

Troubleshooting the QU30 Chiming Seiko Instructions

First, find out if the clock chime is correct. It does not matter what time it is. The hands need to point to the time the clock thinks it is. Which means where the clock is chiming.

So when the clocks chimes, make note of how many times it does so. Then remove the hands. Put them back on to point to the number of chimes it rang. In other words, 3 chimes means put the hands on the clock to point to 3 o'clock. The final step it to set it to the correct time by either the rotating the setting knob or rotating the minute hand slowly in a clockwise manner. Always rotate it clockwise.

Additionally, if the clock minute hand will not point exactly to the 12, do this. Find the circle setting knob on the back of the movement and hold this still with fingers so it will not move. At the same time, point the minute hand to the 12 where it needs to be. Let go of both and it will be correct from then on forth.


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Quartz Chime Clock Movement #QU22

Posted on    Posted in  turned_in_not  
Chiming Pendulum Quartz Clock Movements - Replace, or improve an existing pendulum quartz clock. Or build your own clock creation. - Clockworks 
Chiming QuartzAssembly DiagramMovement RemovalQuartz InstallationMovement MeasuringMeasuring Post LengthsDefinitions
Please view these information tabs to learn more Info about Chiming Quartz Movements

Quartz Clock Movement Removal

This note explains quartz clock movement removal from the case. The following does not apply to quartz units made in Germany or inserts. To remove the movement, need access to the back of the clock and the front side of the clock dial. There are so many case designs it would not be possible to cover all of the different variations. The clock case went to together so it comes apart. It may take a bit of probing but there is always a way to take it apart because it went together.

Getting access to the dial area

There are many case designs and styles and there is no way for us to know how the current specific clock went together. Most of the time the removal process is very easy but of course there are some instances where it is not user friendly. Thus, it is on the users end to be able to access the dial and movement area to continue with the swap out.

Clock hand removal

Quartz clock movement removal always needs the hands to come off first. There are two reasons for this. First, need to have access to the hardware that mounts the movement. Second, there is no way to take get the movement out of the clock if the hands are still on it. They certainly will not fit through the hole in the clock.

Quartz Clock Movement Removal - Minute hand

Quartz clock movements have two styles of minute hands. One style has a nut that holds it in place and the other style is a friction fit. The friction fit has no nut and just pulls off with a twist and pull. The second style has a minute hand nut to secure the minute hand. Removal is done by turning the nut to the left with needle nose pliers. Once the nut is loose it only requires fingers to unscrew it.

Hour hand

In a Quartz clock Movement removal task, the hour hand is only a friction fit. Thus, the hour tube tapers down on the movement, meaning it is wider on the low end of it. This makes the hour hand friction fit only. Just twist the hand and pull it until it comes off.

Second hand

The second hand pulls straight up and off if the clock has one.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020
Clock Dial

Quartz clock movement installation

In essence, this is a quick step by step practical guide for the quartz clock movement installation. The first step is to get the old unit out of the way. Of course, this is done by removing the hands from the clock.

Then remove the hex nut that is on the post where the hands were. In essence, the movement will fall out the back of the clock dial. On occasion, the movement will have glue holding it in place. So, if this is the case, very gently pry the movement off of the back of the clock with a screwdriver. Now it is out of the way and installation of the new quartz clock movement bought from Clockworks can be done. Likewise, Quartz clock movement installation is usually very easy. Altogether, these are the assembly instructions for the time only quartz clock movement into the clock case.

Sequential order of installation

  • 1. Place the steel hanger over the threaded post (optional)
  • 2. Place black rubber washer on the post next (optional)
  • 3. Start mounting the movement by putting the post through the dial
  • 4. Then on the front of the dial, slide the brass washer onto the post of the movement.
  • 5. Put the hex nut on post and tighten so it holds the movement to the back of the clock face.
  • 6. Push hour hand on the post by friction fit
  • 7. Put the minute hand on the post
  • 8. If using a second screw the doughnut on to hold the minute hand in place. Then install the second hand now by friction fit. The post just sticks onto the pin at the end of the post.
  • 9. If not using a second hand just secure the minute hand with the pretty cap nut.

The movement installation is now complete

Naturally, this applies to all battery operated clock movements available on Clockworks. For example, chiming quartz, time only, and high torque. Of course, the exception to this would be clock inserts.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Quartz clock movement measuring

Please select the post length when ordering a new quartz clock movement. Of course, when doing quartz clock movement measuring, remember the post will need to be able to go through the thickness of the dial face. Also remember that the dial may or may not have a wood backing to it. With a wood backing the clock dial or face would be thicker and thus would need a longer post. Clockworks offers multiple post lengths on quartz clock movements for this reason. In other words, the post has to be long enough to go through whatever thickness we are calling the dial.

How to measure quartz clock movement post

What to measure

Clockworks offers multiple post lengths for quartz movements. When completing a quartz clock movement measurement, you will need to measure the post on the old movement. This is so it can match up with the new quartz movement. To clarify, the post is the part that goes through the dial (face) and mounts from the front and what is in a quartz clock movement measurement. This applies to all Clockworks quartz movements, including chiming quartz, and time only quartz movements.

Length depends on dial thickness

When working on a quartz clock movement measurement the post has to be long enough to go through whatever thickness that the clock face/dial, might be. The length of the threaded portion of the post/shaft, is the measurement needed. The threaded shaft needs to go through the dial/face of the clock from the back to the front. It needs to be long enough for a small hex nut to screw onto it. It can’t be too long or the hands will not move correctly. Clockworks has a variety of quartz clock movement lengths to accommodate a variety of different materials since some are wood and some are metal and some are plastic, etc.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Measuring quartz post lengths

Above all, when replacing a quartz movement it means measuring quartz post lengths. Subsequently, the post will stick out through the front of the clock dial. Of course, there needs to be enough threads sticking out for the hex nut to be put on. Hence, the movement will be held in place to the back of the dial (clock face) and will not move. Sometimes if the clock has glass over the face it is possible for the post to hit it. Therefore it is important to measure the quartz post length correctly. In other words, if the post hits the glass, the hands will not be able to move. Thus making the clock not work.

Use the chart if building a clock

With that being said, find the correct quartz post length by using the chart below. So remember, the threads on the post need to be at least 2/16 longer than the thickness of the clock dial. To clarify, a clock dial is the face (also called the thing with the numbers on it). As always, email us if there is any question.

Measuring quartz post lengths if replacing a clock

If replacing a movement and not building a clock, it is easier to measure the quartz post length of the old movement. Before measuring, remove the movement first by taking off the hands and then the hex nut. Next, measure the length of the post that has the threads that the hex nut was on. In short, only measure the fat part of the hand shaft that we call a post. Also, never include the part that the hands go on when measuring the post length. All in all, the new unit needs to be the same post length as the old movement. Overall, this applies to all quartz clock movements available on Clockworks such as chiming quartz and time only quartz.

Dial Thickness

  • 1/16 inch thick
  • 3/16 inch thick
  • 5/16 inch thick
  • 9/16 inch thick
  • 3/4 inch thick

Size Post Needed

  • 3/16"
  • 5/16"
  • 7/16"
  • 11/16"
  • 15/16"
How to measure quartz clock movement post
The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Quartz Chime Clock Movement

Takane Westminster chiming quartz clock movement. This movement is simple in design and to use. There is not a lot of options to figure out and costs less also. The chime is the electronic type and comes out of a built in speaker. No speaker to mount, not many settings, simple economical compact and effective.

Accessories

The pendulum comes 16 inches at its longest and the bob comes in three diameter options. Or the clock can be shipped as a non pendulum unit, please see the drop down list of options. The clock hands and the second hand are sold separately.
Chime Pendulum Clock Movement When replacing please measure the post on the old unit, so it can be matched up with the new chime pendulum clock movement. The post is the part that goes through the dial (face) and mounts from the front.

Chime Pendulum Clock Movement

Assistance = 800-381-7458

Dial Thickness

  • 1/16 inch thick
  • 3/16 inch thick
  • 5/16 inch thick
  • 9/16 inch thick
  • 3/4 inch thick

Size Post Needed

  • 3/16"
  • 5/16"
  • 7/16"
  • 11/16"
  • 15/16"

Chime Sample

Westminster

Attributes

  • 16 inch pendulum at longest
  • Westminster chime

Movement

Takane made chiming quartz clock movement that plays Westminster on the hour and then strikes out the hour.

Hands

Any of the quartz hands Clockworks offers will fit this unit. The hour hand will have a round hole and the minute hand would have a oblong hole. The hour hand goes on as a friction fit, then the minute hand goes on the upper post with its nut. A second hand can be used only if its wanted. All hands are sold separately and is offered here as well.

Pendulum

The pendulum movements comes with a free pendulum that is 16 inches at its longest. However it can be shortened to anything less than 16 inches with ease. The pendulum has three bob diameter options to choose from, the bob is the round disk at the bottom of the pendulum rod. Please note although this is a pendulum unit, it can be used with or without the pendulum. If a pendulum is not used, you can just lock the pendulum swinger to one side and not use it.

Mounting Post

The movement's threaded post comes in three lengths. This is the wide threaded part that takes the hex nut. This post length is what we measure, the actual part that the hands go onto sticks out another ¼ inch beyond. The posts are all 7/16 wide and this is wider then the typical ⅜ wide posts that are found on the market. Be sure the dial has a hole diameter of ½ inch wide for this to go through.

Features

    • Westminster and then strike out the hourly count
    • Second Hand Option
    • Pendulum Option
    • Takes one C Cell Battery

Instructions

  1. Insert a C cell battery into the movement.
  2. Make it chime the hours by turning the knob on the back
  3. Install the hands where the clock chimed.

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#QU22NP Chiming Quartz Clock Movement

Posted on    Posted in  turned_in_not  

Low price chiming unit that does not take up much room.

  • 4x4 Westminster Chime
  • Chime synchronization knob
  • 16' pendulum at longest
  • Takes one C cell battery
  • Made by Takane
  • Built in speaker
  • 7/16 Diameter Post
  • Size: 4 x 3 x 1 1/4

How to make the clock chime when its supposed to.

First we need to know, the clock chime is correct no matter what it says the chime is, its right. We only need to have the hands point to where the clock thinks it is, or where its chiming in other words. And then set the clock to time.

So to point the hands to where the clock chimed we need to remove the hands, and put them back on the clock where the clock chimed. In other words if it chimed out that its 3 oclock, put the hour hand to the three and the minute hand to the 12.

IF the clock minute hand will not point exactly to the 12, do this. Find the circle spinning setting knob on the back of the movement and hold this still with your fingers so it will not move. At the same time you stop this from moving, point the minute hand to the 12 where it was supposed to point to when it chimed. Let go of both.

Commonly bought with..

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    Serpentine Quartz Hands #H1

    Serpentine Quartz Hands #H1 will fit the time only clock movement from clockworks. The hour hand will have a round hole, and the minute hand will have an oblong hole.

    H1: $1.00$9.00
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    Rounded Quartz Clock Hands #H12

    Rounded quartz clock hands for the standard "I" shaft battery clock movements. Basically if it takes a battery and you got it from clockworks.com, these will fit.

    H12: $1.00
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    Crescent-Moon Quartz Clock Hands #H10

    Crescent-Moon quartz clock hands for the standard "I" shaft battery clock movements. Basically if it takes a battery and you got it from clockworks.com, these will fit. We only carry the "I" shaft units.

    H10: $1.00
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    Wiggle Quartz Clock Hands #H11

    Wiggle quartz clock hands for the standard "I" shaft battery clock movements. Basically if it takes a battery and you got it from clockworks.com, these will fit.

    H11: $1.00
    View Product

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Non-Pendulum Chiming Seiko Quartz Clock Movement

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Non-Pendulum Chiming Seiko Quartz Clock Movement

Non-Pendulum Chiming Seiko Quartz Clock Movement is a quality C cell dual chime movement by Seiko. Will play either Westminster or Whittington on the quarter hour. Available in a variety of post lengths, with or without a pendulum. Check out the sound samples below:

Westminister Sound Sample Whittington Sound Sample Dimensions of the movement: 2 1/2' x 3 1/4' x 1 1/2'

How to make the clock chime when its supposed to.

First we need to know, the clock chime is correct no matter what it says the chime is, its right. We only need to have the hands point to where the clock thinks it is, or where its chiming in other words. And then set the clock to time.

So to point the hands to where the clock chimed we need to remove the hands, and put them back on the clock where the clock chimed. In other words if it chimed out that its 3 oclock, put the hour hand to the three and the minute hand to the 12.

IF the clock minute hand will not point exactly to the 12, do this. Find the circle spinning setting knob on the back of the movement and hold this still with your fingers so it will not move. At the same time you stop this from moving, point the minute hand to the 12 where it was supposed to point to when it chimed. Let go of both.


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New Quartz Chiming Movement

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Chiming Quartz Instructions

New Quartz Chiming Movement

New Quartz Chiming Movement. These chiming units take two C-cell batteries and plays Rod sound Westminster chime, Tubular bell sound Westminster chime, Ava Maria chime, Gong strike-full hour count $ single stroke on half-hour. Plus FOUR different Christmas songs. Well made German quartz movements that last for a long time, but seem to give up the ghost during daylight savings when they do die.

Clock Dial

Hermle Quartz Clock Movement Replacement

Assistance = 800-381-7458

Dial Thickness

  • 1/16 inch thick
  • 3/16 inch thick
  • 5/16 inch thick
  • 9/16 inch thick
  • 3/4 inch thick

Needs this Post Size

  • 3/16"
  • 5/16"
  • 7/16"
  • 11/16"
  • 15/16"

Getting to the dial and hands

There are many clock case designs and styles so this is difficult to give an exact procedure. Sometimes it is very easy to get to the dial and hands. Other times the dial has glass over it and may require you to figure out how the clock case was put together. Of course, you may have to remove some screws, or if there is a bezel the bezel tabs may need to be bent to get it to come off. Once you're at the point where you can remove the hands and also the back of the quartz unit, you're good to start replacing the unit.

Removing the clock hands

If there is a second hand on the clock, grab it with your fingers and pull it straight off of the clock. Hold the minute hand still as you turn the nut to the left with needle nose pliers to remove the nut and the hand. Next is the hour hand, this is only a friction fit, twist and pull off.

Removing a Hermle Quartz Movement

First thing to do when replacing a Hermle quartz clock movement is to get the old unit out of the clock case. Remove the hands and then the nut with the double slots under the hands. This nut turns to the left to unscrew, but it is not easy to do sometimes. A clock maker will have a special tool for these units only, but the customer is left to use two flat screwdrivers to do it. It is easy to slip and scratch the dial when doing this. Use a flathead screwdriver on both sides of the nut and turn them both at once to the left. The nut will come off and the movement will fall out from the back side.

Quartz movement installation

These are the assembly instructions for the time only quartz clock movement.
  1. Place hanger on post (optional)
  2. Place black washer on post (optional)
  3. Put post through the clock dial face
  4. Slide the brass washer onto the post of the movement that is sticking out of the clock dial face
  5. Put hex nut on post and tighten to hold movement to the back of the clock face.

    Quartz hands installation

  1. Push hour hand onto the post as far down as it will go without touching the clock face.
  2. Put the minute hand on the post
  3. If using a second hand, skip to step 9 otherwise screw the cap nut on and it is done
  4. If using a second hand, screw the small nut on top of minute hand then push the second hand onto the pin in the center.
  5. You are done installing you're brand new quartz clock movement !

Clock Dial

About the movement

The MSO quartz movement has step motion timekeeping accuracy and includes a time setting knob on the back of the unit. Additionally, there is a knob on the back to set the time, and is useful if the hands are not easily accessible from the front. Although this is a pendulum unit it can run with or without the pendulum. The pendulum motion does not have anything to do with the timekeeping on this unit. Another thing to keep in mind is that the clock hands are sold separately.

About the chimes

This unit will play either Westminster or Ave Maria with premium sound quality. It is quite possible this is the only quartz movement that plays Ave Maria on the market at this point. Additionally, it also has the ability to play the chime every quarter hour or only on the top of the hour. Please note that the clock chime may take an hour to correct itself, when using the hand setting knob. Of course the sound is premium as it has a larger external speaker that mounts anywhere in the clock case with just two small wood screws. The strike count at the top of the hour can be set by the button on the back of the unit. It will advance the strike count one hour each time the button is pressed. Doing this will not move the hands.

About the hands

The MSO quartz unit uses any of the low torque quartz hands that Clockworks has to offer. If replacing a Hermle quartz unit, new hands also need to be bought for your new unit as your old ones will no longer fit. It is possible to use a needle file to make the old hands fit the new unit. However it is best to just get the new hands with it just in case. This unit will take a second hand but it is optional. Clockworks offers the hands for this unit below.

About the pendulum

Overall, the free pendulum that comes with the movement is 16 inches. However, it has segments every inch so measure what you need, bend it and snap it off. Similarly, the pendulum has three bob diameter options to choose from. The bob is the round disk at the bottom of the pendulum rod. Please note, although this is a pendulum unit, it can run with or without the pendulum. If you do not need to use a pendulum then lock the pendulum swinger to one side.

About the post lengths

The movement has threads on the post and comes in two lengths. This is the fat part with the threads that takes the hex nut. The post length is what we measure. Do not count the part that the hands go onto in the measurement. The post lengths available for this unit is either 5/16 long or 9/16 long. The posts are all 5/16 wide, and fit into a ⅜ dial hole.

Features

  • Westminster or Ave Maria
  • Quarterly or Hourly Chime
  • Volume Control
  • Second Hand Option
  • Pendulum Option
  • Takes Two C Cell Batteries

Instructions

  1. Connect the speaker wire.
  2. Install two C-cell batteries, plus side up.
  3. Turn set knob until it strikes the hours.
  4. Put the hands on, pointing to that hour.
  5. Never turn the minute hand backwards.
  6. Choose the chime options.

Making it chime on time

Make the clock chime and count how many times it strikes. Then take off the hands and put them back on to display the number of strikes. In other words, if there were 3 strikes put the hands on to point to 3 o'clock.

If the clock minute hand will not point exactly to the 12, do this. Find the circle setting knob on the back of the movement and hold this still with your fingers so it will not move. At the same time, point the minute hand to the 12. Then let go of both.

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Quartz – Pendulum Clock Movement

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Chiming Pendulum Quartz Clock Movements - Replace, or improve an existing pendulum quartz clock. Or build your own clock creation. - Clockworks 
Chiming QuartzAssembly DiagramMovement RemovalQuartz InstallationMovement MeasuringMeasuring Post LengthsDefinitions
Please view these information tabs to learn more Info about Chiming Quartz Movements

Quartz Clock Movement Removal

This note explains quartz clock movement removal from the case. The following does not apply to quartz units made in Germany or inserts. To remove the movement, need access to the back of the clock and the front side of the clock dial. There are so many case designs it would not be possible to cover all of the different variations. The clock case went to together so it comes apart. It may take a bit of probing but there is always a way to take it apart because it went together.

Getting access to the dial area

There are many case designs and styles and there is no way for us to know how the current specific clock went together. Most of the time the removal process is very easy but of course there are some instances where it is not user friendly. Thus, it is on the users end to be able to access the dial and movement area to continue with the swap out.

Clock hand removal

Quartz clock movement removal always needs the hands to come off first. There are two reasons for this. First, need to have access to the hardware that mounts the movement. Second, there is no way to take get the movement out of the clock if the hands are still on it. They certainly will not fit through the hole in the clock.

Quartz Clock Movement Removal - Minute hand

Quartz clock movements have two styles of minute hands. One style has a nut that holds it in place and the other style is a friction fit. The friction fit has no nut and just pulls off with a twist and pull. The second style has a minute hand nut to secure the minute hand. Removal is done by turning the nut to the left with needle nose pliers. Once the nut is loose it only requires fingers to unscrew it.

Hour hand

In a Quartz clock Movement removal task, the hour hand is only a friction fit. Thus, the hour tube tapers down on the movement, meaning it is wider on the low end of it. This makes the hour hand friction fit only. Just twist the hand and pull it until it comes off.

Second hand

The second hand pulls straight up and off if the clock has one.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020
Clock Dial

Quartz clock movement installation

In essence, this is a quick step by step practical guide for the quartz clock movement installation. The first step is to get the old unit out of the way. Of course, this is done by removing the hands from the clock.

Then remove the hex nut that is on the post where the hands were. In essence, the movement will fall out the back of the clock dial. On occasion, the movement will have glue holding it in place. So, if this is the case, very gently pry the movement off of the back of the clock with a screwdriver. Now it is out of the way and installation of the new quartz clock movement bought from Clockworks can be done. Likewise, Quartz clock movement installation is usually very easy. Altogether, these are the assembly instructions for the time only quartz clock movement into the clock case.

Sequential order of installation

  • 1. Place the steel hanger over the threaded post (optional)
  • 2. Place black rubber washer on the post next (optional)
  • 3. Start mounting the movement by putting the post through the dial
  • 4. Then on the front of the dial, slide the brass washer onto the post of the movement.
  • 5. Put the hex nut on post and tighten so it holds the movement to the back of the clock face.
  • 6. Push hour hand on the post by friction fit
  • 7. Put the minute hand on the post
  • 8. If using a second screw the doughnut on to hold the minute hand in place. Then install the second hand now by friction fit. The post just sticks onto the pin at the end of the post.
  • 9. If not using a second hand just secure the minute hand with the pretty cap nut.

The movement installation is now complete

Naturally, this applies to all battery operated clock movements available on Clockworks. For example, chiming quartz, time only, and high torque. Of course, the exception to this would be clock inserts.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Quartz clock movement measuring

Please select the post length when ordering a new quartz clock movement. Of course, when doing quartz clock movement measuring, remember the post will need to be able to go through the thickness of the dial face. Also remember that the dial may or may not have a wood backing to it. With a wood backing the clock dial or face would be thicker and thus would need a longer post. Clockworks offers multiple post lengths on quartz clock movements for this reason. In other words, the post has to be long enough to go through whatever thickness we are calling the dial.

How to measure quartz clock movement post

What to measure

Clockworks offers multiple post lengths for quartz movements. When completing a quartz clock movement measurement, you will need to measure the post on the old movement. This is so it can match up with the new quartz movement. To clarify, the post is the part that goes through the dial (face) and mounts from the front and what is in a quartz clock movement measurement. This applies to all Clockworks quartz movements, including chiming quartz, and time only quartz movements.

Length depends on dial thickness

When working on a quartz clock movement measurement the post has to be long enough to go through whatever thickness that the clock face/dial, might be. The length of the threaded portion of the post/shaft, is the measurement needed. The threaded shaft needs to go through the dial/face of the clock from the back to the front. It needs to be long enough for a small hex nut to screw onto it. It can’t be too long or the hands will not move correctly. Clockworks has a variety of quartz clock movement lengths to accommodate a variety of different materials since some are wood and some are metal and some are plastic, etc.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Measuring quartz post lengths

Above all, when replacing a quartz movement it means measuring quartz post lengths. Subsequently, the post will stick out through the front of the clock dial. Of course, there needs to be enough threads sticking out for the hex nut to be put on. Hence, the movement will be held in place to the back of the dial (clock face) and will not move. Sometimes if the clock has glass over the face it is possible for the post to hit it. Therefore it is important to measure the quartz post length correctly. In other words, if the post hits the glass, the hands will not be able to move. Thus making the clock not work.

Use the chart if building a clock

With that being said, find the correct quartz post length by using the chart below. So remember, the threads on the post need to be at least 2/16 longer than the thickness of the clock dial. To clarify, a clock dial is the face (also called the thing with the numbers on it). As always, email us if there is any question.

Measuring quartz post lengths if replacing a clock

If replacing a movement and not building a clock, it is easier to measure the quartz post length of the old movement. Before measuring, remove the movement first by taking off the hands and then the hex nut. Next, measure the length of the post that has the threads that the hex nut was on. In short, only measure the fat part of the hand shaft that we call a post. Also, never include the part that the hands go on when measuring the post length. All in all, the new unit needs to be the same post length as the old movement. Overall, this applies to all quartz clock movements available on Clockworks such as chiming quartz and time only quartz.

Dial Thickness

  • 1/16 inch thick
  • 3/16 inch thick
  • 5/16 inch thick
  • 9/16 inch thick
  • 3/4 inch thick

Size Post Needed

  • 3/16"
  • 5/16"
  • 7/16"
  • 11/16"
  • 15/16"
How to measure quartz clock movement post
The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Time - Pendulum Clock Movement

This time and pendulum quartz clock movement will run a light weight pendulum that is 16 inches at longest. The quartz pendulum we offer is 16 inches (406mm) at its total length, however this can be shortened. The back of the pendulum rod has notches each inch up the rod, so all that is required is to bend and snap at the desired length. The pendulum comes with its round pendulum bob for the bottom swinging portion. This pendulum bob is available in three diameters. The pendulum with its bob is a separate purchase.

May need new hands for the clock movement

The old hands will usually work on the new pendulum quartz unit. However there are some instances where they will not. If the old unit has an hour and minute hand both with round mounting holes, they will not fit the new movement. It is best just to get the new hands either way so it does not have too be a concern. They are sold as a pair but only the minute hand is measured. The minute hand is measured from the mounting hole to the end.

Pendulum Quartz Clock Movements

Post Length Measuring

To replace a pendulum quartz clock movement, the threaded post that the hex nut screws onto will need to be measured. This is the wide post the 6 sided nut screws onto only. The section that the hands mount too will extend beyond this measurement by 1/4 inch.

Pendulum Quartz Clock Movements

Pendulum Quartz Clock Movement

Dial Thickness

  • 1/16 inch thick
  • 3/16 inch thick
  • 5/16 inch thick
  • 9/16 inch thick
  • 3/4 inch thick

Size Post Needed

  • 3/16"
  • 5/16"
  • 7/16"
  • 11/16"
  • 15/16"

Movement

Time and pendulum quartz clock movement with a 16 inch pendulum that can be shorted to whatever less length.

Hands

Any of the hands Clockworks offers for quartz clock movements will fit this unit. The hour hand will have a round hole and the minute hand would have a oblong hole. The hour hand goes on as a friction fit, then the minute hand goes on the upper post with its nut. A second hand can be used only if its wanted. All hands are sold separately and is offered here as well.

Pendulum

This clock can run a light weight pendulum up to 16 inches at its longest, sold separately. However it can be shortened to anything less than 16 inches with ease. The pendulum we offer has three bob diameter options to choose from, the bob is the round disk at the bottom of the pendulum rod. Please note although this is a pendulum unit, it can be used with or without the pendulum. If a pendulum is not used, you can just lock the pendulum swinger to one side and not use it.

Mounting Post

The movements threaded post comes in three lengths. This is the fat threaded part that takes the hex nut. This post length is what we measure, the actual part that the hands go onto sticks out another ¼ inch beyond this measurement, but we do not count that in the measurement. There are many post lengths available for this unit. The posts are all 5/16 wide and fits through a ⅜ wide dial hole.

The swing

Get the case width, minus bob diameter and minus 6 inches. This is the approximate minimum inside case requirements. In other words the bob usually needs 3 inches to swing back and forth on each side of it. Depends of coarse on bob diameter and length but this rule is for a full length pendulum with its widest swing. Full length is 16 inches, shorten to anything less. It is best and recommended to of course get the movement first and see what the swing is in live action before building a clock case.

Features

  • Step motion
  • Second hand optional
  • Takes Pendulum up to 16 inches
  • Takes one AA Battery

Instructions

  1. Insert AA battery into the movement.
  2. Mount to the back of the dial with provided hardware
  3. Hang the pendulum on it.
  4. Install the hands.

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