Mechanical Clock Suspension Spring

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Clock Pendulum Parts for the mechanical clock pendulum assembly are offered on this webpage, such as bobs and suspension springs.
Pendulum PartsDefinitionsMissing partsLength infoTimingSuspension infoSuspension InstallLeader infoTop Hook info
Please view these information tabs to learn more about replacing clock pendulum parts.

Clock pendulum components description

Altogether, this is a description of the clock pendulum parts and components. Please use this as a glossary of the parts to a clock pendulum assembly. Knowing the correct terms for the various pendulum parts is helpful when locating replacements. We are pretty adept at deciphering descriptions of parts however knowing the name is always something we welcome.

The clock pendulum

First, a clock pendulum includes the bottom rating nut and threads, the pendulum bob, and top hook. Additionally, these items are removable on wood stick pendulums only. Lyre metal clock pendulums do not have the ability to come apart.

Clock pendulum leader

Second, a leader is the part that the pendulum hangs onto when it is installed on the clock. It then in turn hooks to the suspension spring on the very top of the pendulum assembly. Naturally, pendulum leaders vary depending on the manufacturer of the clock movement and they can also vary in length as well as style. Sometimes there can be more than one type of leader for the same movement. There are also instances where we custom make leaders for customers.

Suspension spring description

The clock pendulum suspension spring is the short spring steel part on the very top of the pendulum assembly. Its purpose is to suspend the leader and pendulum in the air. Generally speaking, its steel spring like strips flex to let the pendulum swing back and forth with ease and momentum.

Clock Pendulum Components Complete

In summary, the clock pendulum components description includes the pendulum hanging on the leader and the leader hanging on the suspension spring. Put the complete pendulum assembly on the clock and it is ready to go. The next step is to put the clock in beat and run the clock to see how the time keeping is.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Replacing Lost Pendulum Parts

By and large, replacing a lost pendulum part from its assembly is a process. It is more complicated than just matching up the broken pendulum part. Certainly, narrowing it down requires a different method than just observation. The following text will guide you through that process.

The lost pendulum

First, identify the movement manufacturer. This is the beginning step to identify a lost clock pendulum. This is done by getting the movement numbers off of the back plate of the movement itself. That is to say, it will not be in the manual that came with the clock. Moreover it will also not be on any stickers or the clock case. Match the movement number here to find out who made the movement. Finally, proceed to the pendulum page. This is the first step in replacing a lost pendulum as well as replacing lost pendulum parts.

Hermle Clock Movement Availability

Lost pendulum leader

The leader hooks to the suspension spring. The suspension spring is located at the top of the movement. The pendulum hangs onto the leader. All or some of these parts are what you need to order to replace lost pendulum parts. Again, the order of the parts is the suspension spring, the leader, then the pendulum.

If the leader is missing, identify who made the movement. Use the above information to correctly identify the movement so it is possible to replace the pendulum part. The leader possibilities are narrowed down considerably upon knowing who made the movement. This makes things much easier when replacing lost pendulum parts. After knowing the manufacturer, match the information to a leader shown on this page. In the final analysis, visually inspect the pendulum hook style, the crutch on the back of the movement, and the suspension hook. Finally, compare the components of the clock to the options in that manufacturer category to figure out the best one. Replacing lost pendulum part can be tricky however with these descriptions the task should be less daunting.

The lost suspension spring

First know that style A is the very most common suspension spring style in existence. Check the top of the pendulum leader and if there is a double hook on the end it will be style A required for the clock. Generally speaking, style A3 is used for large grandfather units, A2 for grandmother and wall clocks, and A1 for mantle clocks. Suspension spring are one of the easier parts to ascertain when replacing lost pendulum parts.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

The mechanical clock pendulum length

A pendulum clock without a pendulum is a shame for sure. Hence, getting the mechanical clock pendulum length correct does take some diving into the clock world. I there is no idea what pendulum it would take, this is a basic guide. Of course, this is a basic guide to narrow it down to the best pendulum for the clock. This will cover most situations, without special equipment to figure out the length.

The movement CM or PL stamp

On the back plate of the clock movement usually, there are some numbers and or letters for identification. Likewise, there may be an indication of how long the pendulum should be in the mix of these numbers. It may say CM or PL and this stands for centimeter or pendulum length. Subsequently, this would be the length where it should keep approximate time. Generally, this is measured in a few different ways usually dependent on country of origin.

Mechanical Clock Pendulum Length for German made movements

Most mechanical German made clock movements are easy to figure out the pendulum length. In essence, the numbers will let us know or the stamp will clearly state the CM or PL number. If it is German, keep in mind the CM length is not the actual pendulum length. Altogether, German units measure this length from the top of the clock movement, and this includes the three components of the pendulum all in one length, in centimeters. This length will include the pendulum itself, the leader that it hooks to, and the suspension spring on the top that the leader hooks on to, all in one CM measurement. To clarify, CM stands for centimeter and PL stands for pendulum length.

If no stamp try to convert

With no pendulum length stamped into the movement some added steps are involved. The numbers on the back plate will cross reference to the pendulum length required. The first step is to identify the manufacturer of the clock movement by using the movement numbers. The movement numbers indicate who actually manufactured the movement. Various clock retailers may have have their name stamped onto it, but the numbers are always true to the manufacturer.

Converting numbers to CM length

Moreover, some movements do not have an indication of the pendulum length on the back plate. The unit will have a number that would need to be found on this website first to find out what the correct CM length is for it.

Converted number example

Generally speaking, let's say that the movement has no CM stamp on the movement and only shows the Urgos number UW32319. Go to the identification page to look at the movement number examples. In this example, we see that it is a Urgos. Now it is possible to go to the Urgos page and find the number to see what the pendulum length is. In this example, the pendulum length would be 80cm, representing the full length with the size of the bob factored in.

German grandfather movements

Almost all grandfather clock movements are going to be German if made after 1950. The first thing we need to do is get the numbers off of the back plate of the movement. This is the only way, and we can't cheat by looking at the paperwork or clock case. It has to come right off the back of the clockworks. The manual and the sticker on the case is of no use to get the pendulum.

American clocks

The American mechanical clock movement manufacturers referred to the pendulum length as a "drop". The drop is the length of the pendulum from the hand shaft all the way down to the bottom of the pendulum rating nut threads. It is a different way of measuring the pendulum length then the German made way. Both ways are based on the smallest bob diameter bob. If the bob is larger or heavier, the length would be longer than what is stamped.

No luck

If everything fails for one reason or another, the best chance for a pendulum is the wood stick style. This is the only style of pendulum that can be easily modified because it can be chopped down. These types of clocks are usually antiques, or of Asian origin, and information such as pendulum length is simply not available. Sometimes it takes a good guess on where the manufacturer intended to have the bob sit.

To do it this way, it is only needed a pendulum with a stick that is way too long to begin with. Chop it, try it, chop it, try it. Each time slow, cut an inch and half off of the sticks length and hang it back on. It will only take a couple of times, and if starting way too long it can always go shorter.

Clock makers method for Mechanical Clock Pendulum Lengths

There is another way, its called setting the beat rate. This is a more involved way and usually just done by clock makers. It involves a beat detecting device that counts out the beats per hour, or the beats per minute. To do this, first figure out what the beat rate is supposed to be for that particular movement, and then keep adjusting the pendulum length until it keeps time. There are cell phone apps out there these days that will tell the beat rate and the cell phone will listen and say if the clock will keep time with that pendulum. Go longer or shorter until the phone says the beat rate is set.

Contacting us for help with Mechanical Clock Pendulum Lengths

Please email the movement numbers from the back plate, and explain what part is needed. The email address to send this information is [email protected] Pictures are welcomed but not required. If emailing pictures please include the back side of the clock movement where the markings are.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Timing a mechanical pendulum clock

Timing a mechanical pendulum clock is all about the overall pendulum length. Rarely has anything to do with the movement itself, unless the movement not geared to the proper length from the start. A mechanical clock is easy to time providing the correct pendulum. When the pendulum is correct for that particular movement it will hang on the leader and keep approximate time. The fine timing can be done only with the pendulum adjustment located at the very bottom. At the bottom of the bob is some adjustment threads and a nut. To turn the nut one way raises the bob and the other lowers it. A shorter pendulum will make the clock run faster. A longer pendulum makes the clock run slower.

Fine timing the clock

If the clock is timing slow, raise the pendulum bob by turning the nut at the bottom of the bob. If the clock is fast, do the same but lower the clock's pendulum bob instead. One full turn is somewhere around 1-2 minutes a day faster or slower.

If there is no more adjustment

If the bob is all the way up and its still too slow or fast, shorten either the pendulum or the leader it hangs on to correct.

A lyre pendulum that does not keep time with the bob all the way adjusted will need its length altered. It can be altered with the overall length by the pendulum itself or the leader it hangs onto. The leader is about 5 to 7 inches long and engages with the crutch on back of the movement. The leader is the part that the pendulum top hook will mount to. It is possible to shorten or lengthen the pendulum leader to put the clock in time range with some solder if needed. 1 3/4 inches is a good measurement to make one of these longer or shorter as needed, as this is the length of the threads at the bottom of the bob. So it will give a full timing adjustment range all over again and can go up or down as needed.

German pendulum length CM stamp

The pendulum length is overall and not just the pendulum itself. These German units measure there pendulum lengths from the top of the movement and all the way down. This will include the suspension spring, the leader and also the pendulum itself. This is based on a 4 1/2 inch bob diameter. Of course the larger the bob, the longer it will be beyond that CM stamp measurement.

Used to keep time, now does not

If the clock kept time in the past but now does not, it means a worn gear. The escape wheel is worn and it is advancing more than one tooth at a time. The escape wheel alone would be hard to find, and hard to replace both. The entire movement would be disassembled to replace this worn escape wheel if there is another one found that will work. The cost of having this done would be the same price as a new movement. There is no such thing as having a repair on a clock movement being better than a new movement.

The price would be about the same for a complete overhaul or a brand new one. First see if the clock movement is in production and available new. We do this by getting the numbers off of the back plate of the movement itself, right off of the brass. Please email and we will check the availability and quote for the new one. If the movement is not in production anymore, then a movement restoration is the only option. The movement can be shipped to Clockworks Attn Repair department for a beautiful restoration.

Mechanical Pendulum Clock Timing Issues - Conclusion

Fine timing of the clock is easy as seen. If the clock kept time in the past and now too fast, its time for a new movement and has nothing to do with the pendulum. A worn escape wheel is most likely the cause and a new unit would be less cost then a repair.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Clock Pendulum Suspension Spring

Naturally, suspension springs do not have to be exact in length. If the clock runs slow, simply raise the pendulum bob with the rating nut at the bottom. Likewise, if the clock is running fast then turn the rating nut to lower the pendulum bob.

Most common springs

By and large, suspension spring A is the most common style suspension spring. Of course, it is most likely the one by default. If the old suspension spring looks similar to this one then it is right. As a general rule of thumb, small mantle clocks take suspension A1, wall clocks and small grandmother units will take suspension A2. The A3 size is for grandfather clock units with a larger pendulum bob diameter. This size can also be seen on Grandmother clocks with larger bob diameters. The larger A3 is used with large bob diameters so the bob will not wobble front to back. If using a pendulum with a bob of 8 1/2 inch diameter or larger please order Suspension A3 for this reason.

Not as common

Urgos uses the single hook style as seen in picture suspension B. However suspension A was the very most common to use. Very old antique round movements mainly use Suspension C and Suspension D. These are mainly French clocks and US made units made prior to 1945.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020
For information on how to install a suspension spring click here

Clock Pendulum Leaders

Mechanical pendulum clock leaders for post 1950 movements. These leader will fit clock movements made in Germany after WW2. The first step to replace a lost leader is to visually match one to the old leader. If the leader does not match up to any of the ones listed, please email us. A picture is always helpful. Look to see if the leader needs a double hook or a hole top in order for it to mount to the suspension spring. Similarly, check the other end and notice that configuration as well. What is the required mount style for the pendulum to hang on the clock? In the middle section, what one will engage with the swinging crutch on the back of the movement? These are all important factors to consider when replacing the leader.

The length of the leader

If the leader is missing, however, there are some more steps to figure out what the leader length should be. Not all leaders have variable lengths and the ones that do are for Hermle and Kieninger clock movements only. Kieninger is easy. Those leaders only come in two lengths. Grandfather clocks by Kieninger take the 7 inch leader. Wall and mantle units take the shorter leader. Hermle leaders are much more involved. Determining which leader is the correct length for a Hermle is a process. The next section will describe the ones available.

Hermle leader lengths

A Hermle floor or wall clock will always take leader D or G. leader E is for a low bridge to a high bridge conversion on a Hermle grandmother clock. Therefore, this can be eliminated from the choices if a conversion is not being done. The next choice is leader F which is for mantle clocks. This one is also used to create custom pendulum lengths. Additionally, leader F and leader G are interchangeable. So if a custom leader G is needed, a leader F can be used in its place with an alternate length. Please email us with any questions about Hermle leaders.

Hermle Clock Movement Availability

Leader F for Hermle mantle

Usually mantle clocks with a Hermle clock movement will take leader F. In a situation where the leader is missing and the length is unknown, the following steps need to be taken. This will ensure that the correct leader length is chosen. First, use the CM number off of the back of the movement. This CM length is the pendulum length from the top of the movement all the way down to the bottom of the pendulum. It is not the length of the pendulum itself. Often times this measurement can be confusing. It is important to measure this correctly. Failure to do so will result in the clock not keeping proper time.

Second step, is to take this CM length and divide it by 2.54 to get the inch equivalent. Then subtract the length of the pendulum and the suspension spring length from this measurement. The measurement that is left is the length needed for leader F. There are 1 1/2 inches of thread at the bottom of the pendulum for fine adjustment. Because there is so much room for adjustment, this measurement does not have to be exact. If there wasn't any extra length then it would need to be more precise. However this is not the case so close is good enough.

If the leader is the wrong length

The timing of a clock is determined by the length of the pendulum and the weight of the pendulum bob. This can get a bit confusing for some people. The overall pendulum length is stamped on the back plate of the clock movement with a CM number. This CM stamp is the overall pendulum length from the top of the clock movement all the way down to the bottom of the rating nut. This is based on the smallest bob diameter. Subsequently, a wider pendulum bob will require a longer pendulum. Again, this can get a bit tricky. Please feel free to send an email with any questions. We will be glad to help.

Often enough a clock will either run too fast or too slow. If the pendulum is too long, the clock will run slow. On the other hand, if the pendulum is too short the clock will run too fast. In addition, the wrong leader length will also create problems with accuracy. This may or may not be corrected by raising the bob up or down. This is done by turning the rating nut below the bob. If all else fails, a different leader length may need to be purchased. Before shortening a pendulum it would be best to contact us to see if this is the best option. Cutting the pendulum is the last resort.

In Conclusion

As seen, this is not a cut and dry procedure. There are many factors that play into getting the correct combination so the clock will keep correct time. The correct leader is just one part of the whole process. Sometimes all it takes is a leader that is a bit longer or shorter to correct an issue. There are also times where we have custom made leaders for customers. Measuring is also important. No matter what situation it is we can surely find a solution. Don't ever hesitate to reach out and ask a question. Pictures are always good to send so we can see what exists now. Email is always the fastest way to contact us.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Clock Pendulum Top Hooks

Mechanical clock pendulum top hooks replace broken top hooks or to build a new pendulum. This is a nice alternative to replacing an entire clock pendulum if the top is broken or missing. The top hook is the very top of the pendulum that will enable the pendulum to hang on the leader. To clarify, the leader is the 4 to 7 inch long bar that drives the clock pendulum back and forth.

What they fit

In fact, most of the top hooks here fit German post WW2 mechanical pendulum clocks. There are some top hooks that are for or can be used on antique clocks also. It matters only that the pendulum can hang into the air onto the leader and be stable. Antique clock pendulums can use any one of these top hooks if it will do the job.

How to install

The top hook installation is by friction only. Bend the tabs over and use a punch and a hammer to secure it to the wood stick. Another way is to drill starter holes into the top hook and secure with screws or nails.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Mechanical clock suspension spring

This is the most common suspension spring needed by far. Suspension A1 is for mantle clocks, A2 for wall and grandmother units. The suspension A3 is for larger floor clocks such as a grandfather clock. It is called a suspension because it suspends the pendulum in the air. It is called a spring because it flexes back and forth. If a spare spring is ordered it would be a good idea. One can be put on the bottom of the weight section of the clock for next time. That way the search to find the next one will be saved.


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Mechanical Clock Pendulum Suspension

Posted on    Posted in  turned_in_not  
Clock Pendulum Parts for the mechanical clock pendulum assembly are offered on this webpage, such as bobs and suspension springs.
Pendulum PartsDefinitionsMissing partsLength infoTimingSuspension infoSuspension InstallLeader infoTop Hook info
Please view these information tabs to learn more about replacing clock pendulum parts.

Clock pendulum components description

Altogether, this is a description of the clock pendulum parts and components. Please use this as a glossary of the parts to a clock pendulum assembly. Knowing the correct terms for the various pendulum parts is helpful when locating replacements. We are pretty adept at deciphering descriptions of parts however knowing the name is always something we welcome.

The clock pendulum

First, a clock pendulum includes the bottom rating nut and threads, the pendulum bob, and top hook. Additionally, these items are removable on wood stick pendulums only. Lyre metal clock pendulums do not have the ability to come apart.

Clock pendulum leader

Second, a leader is the part that the pendulum hangs onto when it is installed on the clock. It then in turn hooks to the suspension spring on the very top of the pendulum assembly. Naturally, pendulum leaders vary depending on the manufacturer of the clock movement and they can also vary in length as well as style. Sometimes there can be more than one type of leader for the same movement. There are also instances where we custom make leaders for customers.

Suspension spring description

The clock pendulum suspension spring is the short spring steel part on the very top of the pendulum assembly. Its purpose is to suspend the leader and pendulum in the air. Generally speaking, its steel spring like strips flex to let the pendulum swing back and forth with ease and momentum.

Clock Pendulum Components Complete

In summary, the clock pendulum components description includes the pendulum hanging on the leader and the leader hanging on the suspension spring. Put the complete pendulum assembly on the clock and it is ready to go. The next step is to put the clock in beat and run the clock to see how the time keeping is.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Replacing Lost Pendulum Parts

By and large, replacing a lost pendulum part from its assembly is a process. It is more complicated than just matching up the broken pendulum part. Certainly, narrowing it down requires a different method than just observation. The following text will guide you through that process.

The lost pendulum

First, identify the movement manufacturer. This is the beginning step to identify a lost clock pendulum. This is done by getting the movement numbers off of the back plate of the movement itself. That is to say, it will not be in the manual that came with the clock. Moreover it will also not be on any stickers or the clock case. Match the movement number here to find out who made the movement. Finally, proceed to the pendulum page. This is the first step in replacing a lost pendulum as well as replacing lost pendulum parts.

Hermle Clock Movement Availability

Lost pendulum leader

The leader hooks to the suspension spring. The suspension spring is located at the top of the movement. The pendulum hangs onto the leader. All or some of these parts are what you need to order to replace lost pendulum parts. Again, the order of the parts is the suspension spring, the leader, then the pendulum.

If the leader is missing, identify who made the movement. Use the above information to correctly identify the movement so it is possible to replace the pendulum part. The leader possibilities are narrowed down considerably upon knowing who made the movement. This makes things much easier when replacing lost pendulum parts. After knowing the manufacturer, match the information to a leader shown on this page. In the final analysis, visually inspect the pendulum hook style, the crutch on the back of the movement, and the suspension hook. Finally, compare the components of the clock to the options in that manufacturer category to figure out the best one. Replacing lost pendulum part can be tricky however with these descriptions the task should be less daunting.

The lost suspension spring

First know that style A is the very most common suspension spring style in existence. Check the top of the pendulum leader and if there is a double hook on the end it will be style A required for the clock. Generally speaking, style A3 is used for large grandfather units, A2 for grandmother and wall clocks, and A1 for mantle clocks. Suspension spring are one of the easier parts to ascertain when replacing lost pendulum parts.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

The mechanical clock pendulum length

A pendulum clock without a pendulum is a shame for sure. Hence, getting the mechanical clock pendulum length correct does take some diving into the clock world. I there is no idea what pendulum it would take, this is a basic guide. Of course, this is a basic guide to narrow it down to the best pendulum for the clock. This will cover most situations, without special equipment to figure out the length.

The movement CM or PL stamp

On the back plate of the clock movement usually, there are some numbers and or letters for identification. Likewise, there may be an indication of how long the pendulum should be in the mix of these numbers. It may say CM or PL and this stands for centimeter or pendulum length. Subsequently, this would be the length where it should keep approximate time. Generally, this is measured in a few different ways usually dependent on country of origin.

Mechanical Clock Pendulum Length for German made movements

Most mechanical German made clock movements are easy to figure out the pendulum length. In essence, the numbers will let us know or the stamp will clearly state the CM or PL number. If it is German, keep in mind the CM length is not the actual pendulum length. Altogether, German units measure this length from the top of the clock movement, and this includes the three components of the pendulum all in one length, in centimeters. This length will include the pendulum itself, the leader that it hooks to, and the suspension spring on the top that the leader hooks on to, all in one CM measurement. To clarify, CM stands for centimeter and PL stands for pendulum length.

If no stamp try to convert

With no pendulum length stamped into the movement some added steps are involved. The numbers on the back plate will cross reference to the pendulum length required. The first step is to identify the manufacturer of the clock movement by using the movement numbers. The movement numbers indicate who actually manufactured the movement. Various clock retailers may have have their name stamped onto it, but the numbers are always true to the manufacturer.

Converting numbers to CM length

Moreover, some movements do not have an indication of the pendulum length on the back plate. The unit will have a number that would need to be found on this website first to find out what the correct CM length is for it.

Converted number example

Generally speaking, let's say that the movement has no CM stamp on the movement and only shows the Urgos number UW32319. Go to the identification page to look at the movement number examples. In this example, we see that it is a Urgos. Now it is possible to go to the Urgos page and find the number to see what the pendulum length is. In this example, the pendulum length would be 80cm, representing the full length with the size of the bob factored in.

German grandfather movements

Almost all grandfather clock movements are going to be German if made after 1950. The first thing we need to do is get the numbers off of the back plate of the movement. This is the only way, and we can't cheat by looking at the paperwork or clock case. It has to come right off the back of the clockworks. The manual and the sticker on the case is of no use to get the pendulum.

American clocks

The American mechanical clock movement manufacturers referred to the pendulum length as a "drop". The drop is the length of the pendulum from the hand shaft all the way down to the bottom of the pendulum rating nut threads. It is a different way of measuring the pendulum length then the German made way. Both ways are based on the smallest bob diameter bob. If the bob is larger or heavier, the length would be longer than what is stamped.

No luck

If everything fails for one reason or another, the best chance for a pendulum is the wood stick style. This is the only style of pendulum that can be easily modified because it can be chopped down. These types of clocks are usually antiques, or of Asian origin, and information such as pendulum length is simply not available. Sometimes it takes a good guess on where the manufacturer intended to have the bob sit.

To do it this way, it is only needed a pendulum with a stick that is way too long to begin with. Chop it, try it, chop it, try it. Each time slow, cut an inch and half off of the sticks length and hang it back on. It will only take a couple of times, and if starting way too long it can always go shorter.

Clock makers method for Mechanical Clock Pendulum Lengths

There is another way, its called setting the beat rate. This is a more involved way and usually just done by clock makers. It involves a beat detecting device that counts out the beats per hour, or the beats per minute. To do this, first figure out what the beat rate is supposed to be for that particular movement, and then keep adjusting the pendulum length until it keeps time. There are cell phone apps out there these days that will tell the beat rate and the cell phone will listen and say if the clock will keep time with that pendulum. Go longer or shorter until the phone says the beat rate is set.

Contacting us for help with Mechanical Clock Pendulum Lengths

Please email the movement numbers from the back plate, and explain what part is needed. The email address to send this information is [email protected] Pictures are welcomed but not required. If emailing pictures please include the back side of the clock movement where the markings are.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Timing a mechanical pendulum clock

Timing a mechanical pendulum clock is all about the overall pendulum length. Rarely has anything to do with the movement itself, unless the movement not geared to the proper length from the start. A mechanical clock is easy to time providing the correct pendulum. When the pendulum is correct for that particular movement it will hang on the leader and keep approximate time. The fine timing can be done only with the pendulum adjustment located at the very bottom. At the bottom of the bob is some adjustment threads and a nut. To turn the nut one way raises the bob and the other lowers it. A shorter pendulum will make the clock run faster. A longer pendulum makes the clock run slower.

Fine timing the clock

If the clock is timing slow, raise the pendulum bob by turning the nut at the bottom of the bob. If the clock is fast, do the same but lower the clock's pendulum bob instead. One full turn is somewhere around 1-2 minutes a day faster or slower.

If there is no more adjustment

If the bob is all the way up and its still too slow or fast, shorten either the pendulum or the leader it hangs on to correct.

A lyre pendulum that does not keep time with the bob all the way adjusted will need its length altered. It can be altered with the overall length by the pendulum itself or the leader it hangs onto. The leader is about 5 to 7 inches long and engages with the crutch on back of the movement. The leader is the part that the pendulum top hook will mount to. It is possible to shorten or lengthen the pendulum leader to put the clock in time range with some solder if needed. 1 3/4 inches is a good measurement to make one of these longer or shorter as needed, as this is the length of the threads at the bottom of the bob. So it will give a full timing adjustment range all over again and can go up or down as needed.

German pendulum length CM stamp

The pendulum length is overall and not just the pendulum itself. These German units measure there pendulum lengths from the top of the movement and all the way down. This will include the suspension spring, the leader and also the pendulum itself. This is based on a 4 1/2 inch bob diameter. Of course the larger the bob, the longer it will be beyond that CM stamp measurement.

Used to keep time, now does not

If the clock kept time in the past but now does not, it means a worn gear. The escape wheel is worn and it is advancing more than one tooth at a time. The escape wheel alone would be hard to find, and hard to replace both. The entire movement would be disassembled to replace this worn escape wheel if there is another one found that will work. The cost of having this done would be the same price as a new movement. There is no such thing as having a repair on a clock movement being better than a new movement.

The price would be about the same for a complete overhaul or a brand new one. First see if the clock movement is in production and available new. We do this by getting the numbers off of the back plate of the movement itself, right off of the brass. Please email and we will check the availability and quote for the new one. If the movement is not in production anymore, then a movement restoration is the only option. The movement can be shipped to Clockworks Attn Repair department for a beautiful restoration.

Mechanical Pendulum Clock Timing Issues - Conclusion

Fine timing of the clock is easy as seen. If the clock kept time in the past and now too fast, its time for a new movement and has nothing to do with the pendulum. A worn escape wheel is most likely the cause and a new unit would be less cost then a repair.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Clock Pendulum Suspension Spring

Naturally, suspension springs do not have to be exact in length. If the clock runs slow, simply raise the pendulum bob with the rating nut at the bottom. Likewise, if the clock is running fast then turn the rating nut to lower the pendulum bob.

Most common springs

By and large, suspension spring A is the most common style suspension spring. Of course, it is most likely the one by default. If the old suspension spring looks similar to this one then it is right. As a general rule of thumb, small mantle clocks take suspension A1, wall clocks and small grandmother units will take suspension A2. The A3 size is for grandfather clock units with a larger pendulum bob diameter. This size can also be seen on Grandmother clocks with larger bob diameters. The larger A3 is used with large bob diameters so the bob will not wobble front to back. If using a pendulum with a bob of 8 1/2 inch diameter or larger please order Suspension A3 for this reason.

Not as common

Urgos uses the single hook style as seen in picture suspension B. However suspension A was the very most common to use. Very old antique round movements mainly use Suspension C and Suspension D. These are mainly French clocks and US made units made prior to 1945.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020
For information on how to install a suspension spring click here

Clock Pendulum Leaders

Mechanical pendulum clock leaders for post 1950 movements. These leader will fit clock movements made in Germany after WW2. The first step to replace a lost leader is to visually match one to the old leader. If the leader does not match up to any of the ones listed, please email us. A picture is always helpful. Look to see if the leader needs a double hook or a hole top in order for it to mount to the suspension spring. Similarly, check the other end and notice that configuration as well. What is the required mount style for the pendulum to hang on the clock? In the middle section, what one will engage with the swinging crutch on the back of the movement? These are all important factors to consider when replacing the leader.

The length of the leader

If the leader is missing, however, there are some more steps to figure out what the leader length should be. Not all leaders have variable lengths and the ones that do are for Hermle and Kieninger clock movements only. Kieninger is easy. Those leaders only come in two lengths. Grandfather clocks by Kieninger take the 7 inch leader. Wall and mantle units take the shorter leader. Hermle leaders are much more involved. Determining which leader is the correct length for a Hermle is a process. The next section will describe the ones available.

Hermle leader lengths

A Hermle floor or wall clock will always take leader D or G. leader E is for a low bridge to a high bridge conversion on a Hermle grandmother clock. Therefore, this can be eliminated from the choices if a conversion is not being done. The next choice is leader F which is for mantle clocks. This one is also used to create custom pendulum lengths. Additionally, leader F and leader G are interchangeable. So if a custom leader G is needed, a leader F can be used in its place with an alternate length. Please email us with any questions about Hermle leaders.

Hermle Clock Movement Availability

Leader F for Hermle mantle

Usually mantle clocks with a Hermle clock movement will take leader F. In a situation where the leader is missing and the length is unknown, the following steps need to be taken. This will ensure that the correct leader length is chosen. First, use the CM number off of the back of the movement. This CM length is the pendulum length from the top of the movement all the way down to the bottom of the pendulum. It is not the length of the pendulum itself. Often times this measurement can be confusing. It is important to measure this correctly. Failure to do so will result in the clock not keeping proper time.

Second step, is to take this CM length and divide it by 2.54 to get the inch equivalent. Then subtract the length of the pendulum and the suspension spring length from this measurement. The measurement that is left is the length needed for leader F. There are 1 1/2 inches of thread at the bottom of the pendulum for fine adjustment. Because there is so much room for adjustment, this measurement does not have to be exact. If there wasn't any extra length then it would need to be more precise. However this is not the case so close is good enough.

If the leader is the wrong length

The timing of a clock is determined by the length of the pendulum and the weight of the pendulum bob. This can get a bit confusing for some people. The overall pendulum length is stamped on the back plate of the clock movement with a CM number. This CM stamp is the overall pendulum length from the top of the clock movement all the way down to the bottom of the rating nut. This is based on the smallest bob diameter. Subsequently, a wider pendulum bob will require a longer pendulum. Again, this can get a bit tricky. Please feel free to send an email with any questions. We will be glad to help.

Often enough a clock will either run too fast or too slow. If the pendulum is too long, the clock will run slow. On the other hand, if the pendulum is too short the clock will run too fast. In addition, the wrong leader length will also create problems with accuracy. This may or may not be corrected by raising the bob up or down. This is done by turning the rating nut below the bob. If all else fails, a different leader length may need to be purchased. Before shortening a pendulum it would be best to contact us to see if this is the best option. Cutting the pendulum is the last resort.

In Conclusion

As seen, this is not a cut and dry procedure. There are many factors that play into getting the correct combination so the clock will keep correct time. The correct leader is just one part of the whole process. Sometimes all it takes is a leader that is a bit longer or shorter to correct an issue. There are also times where we have custom made leaders for customers. Measuring is also important. No matter what situation it is we can surely find a solution. Don't ever hesitate to reach out and ask a question. Pictures are always good to send so we can see what exists now. Email is always the fastest way to contact us.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Clock Pendulum Top Hooks

Mechanical clock pendulum top hooks replace broken top hooks or to build a new pendulum. This is a nice alternative to replacing an entire clock pendulum if the top is broken or missing. The top hook is the very top of the pendulum that will enable the pendulum to hang on the leader. To clarify, the leader is the 4 to 7 inch long bar that drives the clock pendulum back and forth.

What they fit

In fact, most of the top hooks here fit German post WW2 mechanical pendulum clocks. There are some top hooks that are for or can be used on antique clocks also. It matters only that the pendulum can hang into the air onto the leader and be stable. Antique clock pendulums can use any one of these top hooks if it will do the job.

How to install

The top hook installation is by friction only. Bend the tabs over and use a punch and a hammer to secure it to the wood stick. Another way is to drill starter holes into the top hook and secure with screws or nails.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Mechanical Clock Pendulum Suspension

Suspension springs are the most commonly needed part for a pendulum on a mechanical clock. It is called a suspension because it suspends the pendulum and hanger aka leader in the air. It is called a spring because it flexes back and forth. If a spare spring is ordered it would be a good idea. One can be put on the bottom of the weight section of the clock for next time. That way the search to find the next one will be saved. By far letter A is the most common sold and has size options. To learn more about the specific suspension spring please click the title of that spring.


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Quartz Clock Second Hand

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Quartz Clock Second Hand

Second hands for quartz clock movements that take a battery. The second hands come in Black / Gold / or Red. Measure from the mounting post to the end of the long side pointer of the hand to get the correct length. If it is a bit too long, snip the tip with a pair of scissors. Easy to install, the hand has a post on the bottom that fits only by friction onto the quartz clock movement. These second hands are optional on all mini movements, the clock can run with or without them.


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Quartz Clock Movement Second-Hand

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Quartz Clock Movement Second-Hand

These second-hands fit clock movements that take a battery. The second hands come in Black / Gold / or Red. Measure from the mounting post to the end of the long side pointer of the hand to get the correct length. If one needs to be a bit shorter, use a pair of scissors to snip the tip. Easy to install, the hand has a post on the bottom that fits only by friction onto the quartz clock movement. These second hands are optional on all mini movements, the clock can run with or without them.


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Battery Clock Second Hand

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Second Hands

Second hands for quartz clock movements that take a battery. The second hands come in Black / Gold / or Red. Measure from the mounting post to the end of the long side pointer of the hand to get the correct length. If it is a bit too long, just snip the tip with a pair of scissors. Easy to install, the hand has a post on the bottom that fits only by friction onto the quartz clock movement. These second hands are optional on all mini movements, the clock can run with or without them.


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Brass Single-End Clock Key

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Clock Keys and Cranks- Use our clock key chart to figure out the exact fit for the clock. We offer keys and grandfather clock cranks.
Clock KeysFinding the right clock keyDouble End Clock Key (F / S at 12) NoteThe clock key chart
Please view these information tabs to help with determining the proper key size for your clock.

Mechanical clock keys

Mechanical clock keys is the clock part that is most frequently lost. Once the clock key is separated from the clock it always seems to end up missing. With the below information and the clock key size chart a key can be ordered.

Getting the right one

We have mechanical clock keys in all the sizes available. Between the key chart or by movement type information below, the chances are good of getting the perfect key. The movement type includes if the clock is made in Germany or USA and when it was made. This is the fastest and most easiest way to get the clock key. The further back in time we go with clocks the more the key chart would need to be used instead. The country of origin would be marked on the back plate of the movement and this can help us get the key.

Keys for German units post WW2

German made post WW2 movements that are square or rectangle will take a number 8 keys or crank. If the clock movement is round and made in Germany the key size is number 4. Some round ones are supposed to take a number 3 but if getting 4 it will still fit and wind the clock either way.

Keys for USA units 1900 - 1950

American clocks made from around 1875 until after the second war almost always take the size 7 clock key. The number 7 keys fits the 8 day time / strike units pretty much every time and this is what USA made the most of. This rule may not apply to Westminster (3 places to wind) or time only (one place to wind) clock movements.

Keys for Korean and Chinese clocks

Size 7 for these units usually. All the 31 day clocks with Asian movements and also US replicas made in India, all take size 7.

The over wound myth

Of course any clock that is not working will be wound all the way up from trying to make it run. Everyone winds it up and the clock does not work so the non working clock is always wound up. The only way a clock can be over wound is if its been wound up for so long that the mainspring stuck. When the mainspring is stuck together to itself with rust and goo for so long it may stick that way. This is rarely the situation and usually the clock would have rust on it if the mainspring is so wound up it will not wind down.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Double End Clock Key (F / S at 12) Note

Some clocks have a small place that looks like a mini clock winding arbor at the 12. It may say F / S or A / R. The F / S this means fast or slow, and the A / R represents advance or retard. This controls the timing of the clock and turning it to fast or advance makes time faster opposite for slow. An ideal double end key fits both the winding arbor to wind the clock and also fits the smaller time regulator aspect. This is not easy to get and at the same time is the most lost part. It is possible to regulate the clock another way with an adjustable bob instead of a fixed length bob.

Get the double end key the hard way

Using the clock key size chart, get the right size that the clock requires. This chart works for both the fast / slow regulator and also to wind the clock. However, this is not easy because it requires a measurement of the post the double end key fits onto. In order to get this measurement remove the clock movement or the dial. Without access to the front of the movement it is hard to measure exactly how wide the arbors are that the key is to go on.

Double end clock key the easy way

There are many sizes and combinations for the double end key and it may be tricky to get the right size. May just want to get the 4 pack of double end keys we offer. This is the top 4 most common double end clock keys that are used so the odds are one will be the correct key. Ideally this will supply the clock with a key that fits both the F/S regulator and the winders. However be aware this 4 pack does not guarantee one will work.

An alternate method

It is possible to forget the whole double end key game and use a single end key instead. It does make things easier and is a better long term solution. Inevitably, once the perfect fit the key will get lost again. This seems to be the trend of what happens. Once the key is separate from the clock, there is a higher chance of it getting lost. Many times we suggest putting the key in the bottom of the clock case for safe keeping

Using an adjustable bob instead

The solution to the double end key problems is to get the single end key to wind the clock. Also get the adjustable bob. The adjustable bob can be regulate the clock with the pendulum instead. The bob will have a nut on the bottom. Raise the bob on the pendulum to speed up time. The opposite is true for slowing time down. Once regulating the clock, it will stay this way for the most part. Some timing may or may not need to be done when the temperature changes vastly. For the most part, time the clock and it will stay that way within a couple of minutes a day all year long. The adjustable pendulum bob comes in three sizes, or bob diameters. The middle or smaller diameter bob is fine for most clocks because the weight is not as important as the length.

Parts available to purchase

Other parts to consider besides the double end clock keys. We have two styles of the adjustable pendulum bobs. One of them is the three sizes of bobs that have the nut underneath. We call this the Adjustable Mantle Clock Bob. There is another style bob that is adjustable from the back side. We just call it the Adjustable Antique Style Mantle Clock Bob. They both function the same, it has a bob on the pendulum that can regulate the time. The part they hang onto is usually a long wire with flex spring steel on the top. This gets bent and cut into shape for the desired length. It comes in a three pack and we call them the Long Suspension Spring Rods.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Clock key size chart explanation

Clock keys have there own number system from 000 to 16 as seen in the Clock key size chart. However the number does not indicate what size is what number and can be confusing. It would make more sense if the key size was the MM of how wide the key was to fit, but this is not how it works. This section is to figure out what key number to order so the clock can be wound up. Subsequently, the clock key gets lost the most out of any other clock part. Of course, it can be tricky to find the right key for your clock because there are many sizes. The Clock key size chart will give us the right size key to order.

Double end clock keys

In addition, some keys have two sizes on one key and this is called a double end key. By and large, the clock key size chart will work for both the wind up part of the clock and also the smaller F / S portion. When the clock has a F / S regulator portion it will be at the 12 o'clock on the dial.

Alternately, if there is a small arbor inside of a hole at 12, this is the time regulator control and the key would have two ends. Thus, it may say F / S at this location or A / R. F / S stands for Fast or Slow, or it could say A / R to stand for Advance or Retard and is referring to the timing of the clock. Of course, if the clock is running fast in time, turn more to the Slow or Retard direction to slow it down. Refer to the Clock key size chart with your measurements to find a key to work with this function.

Getting the right Clock key size

Given these points, to get the key needed, measure the shaft the key is to go on to, then use the Clock key size chart to get the key size needed. Please do not call asking what key the clock needs, as you will be told it would still have to be measured. In short, measure the shaft that the key goes onto in MM and then use the clock key size chart to match it up.

The lazy way instead of the Clock key size chart

The Clock key size chart has all of the sizes listed however sometimes certain key sizes are known. Generally speaking, almost all post 1960 mechanical clocks, made in Germany take a size #8 key or crank, unless the movement is round. Ordinarily the round ones take a number 4. The American time strike antique units mostly take the size 7 key. Match your measurements to the Clock key size chart to be sure.

Shaft width / Key #
  • 1.75mm = 000 Key
  • 2.0mm = 00 Key
  • 2.25mm = 0 Key
  • 2.5mm = 1 Key
  • 2.75mm = 2 Key
Shaft width / Key #
  • 3.0mm = 3 Key
  • 3.25mm = 4 Key
  • 3.5mm = 5 Key
  • 3.75mm = 6 Key
Shaft width / Key #
  • 4.0mm = 7 Key
  • 4.25mm = 8 Key
  • 4.5mm = 9 Key
  • 4.75mm = 10 Key
  • 5.00mm = 11 Key
Shaft width / Key #
  • 5.25mm = 12 Key
  • 5.5mm = 13 Key
  • 5.75mm = 14 Key
  • 6.0mm = 15 Key
The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Brass Single-End Clock Key

Single end brass clock key to wind up a wall or mantle mechanical clock movement. See instructions on the top tabs for how to get the right size key for your clock. Most post 1960 mechanical clocks, made in Germany, take a size #8 key or crank. This is for the most part always true with the exception of round movements the these take size 4.


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Anniversary Clock Suspension Springs

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400 Day Suspension Springs

Single Strength suspension springs in a three pack. These come as the spring only with no fork or blocks. Install the blocks and fork from the old broken one to the new one. Available in all size increments between .0018 and .0040.

Ordering the Anniversary Clock Suspension Springs

Choose the size from the drop down list below. To determine the size, measure the existing spring that is broken. Alternately, try the repair guide on this page to see if your anniversary clock part is in the list. The size indicates only the thickness of the spring and all of the lengths are the same. Consequently, the springs come way too long and the length needs to be cut to size with scissors.


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Cuckoo Clock Hands

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Post WW2 German cuckoo clock repair parts for the professional or hobbyist. Information on how to install these parts onto a cuckoo clock. - Clockworks
Cuckoo PartsCuckoo parts descriptionIf it will not cuckooInstalling the cuckoo handsCuckoo Strike Quantity IssuesCuckoo Door Stuck OpenReplacing Bellow Tops

Please view these information tabs to help with determining the proper parts for your clock.

Cuckoo repair parts

The most common Cuckoo repair parts sold is the bellow tops and the hands. The bellow tubes are usually good to reuse on the clock, just the bellow tops have cloth that rip over time and therefore the clock will not cuckoo the time out.

Repairing cuckoo bellows

If the cloth is ripped the entire cuckoo bellows do not need to be replaced. The bellow tops only can be used. If just replacing the bellow tops it makes things easier to get the correct size for the clock. To get the proper bellow tops measure the length and width of the top only. Snap off the old tops off of the bellow tubes and clean the surface with a knife, then epoxy the new tops on the same way. Then transfer the cuckoo lift rings from the old tops to the new ones and its done.

Cuckoo Clock Repair

Cuckoo Clock Repair

The help section can help with many of the most common issues the clock may have. We also have the cuckoo clock movements for post 1950 German made units. This is about 80 percent of the cuckoos out in the world so chances are we have the movement needed.

If the movement is worn out and is post 1950 its just as well to get the new one instead of restoring the old one. The process of the movement restoration is time consuming and therefore expensive. When the new movement is 100-200 dollars and will last alot longer than the best restoration.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

New cuckoo clock movement not striking

When the new cuckoo clock movement will not go into striking mode for the hours. The bird will not come out and the clock will not indicate what time it is with the cuckoo call. Here are some guidelines on what to check in this situation.

See if the cuckoo door is latched shut

There is a wire above the cuckoo door that locks it into the closed position. This is for either shipping the clock and also for chime shut off. It is a small wire that stops the door and just gets turned to either in the way or out of the way of the door. Be sure it is out of the way so the door can open and it can cuckoo.

Check the silence lever

There may be a silence lever if the cuckoo movement has one. This would be located on the side of the cuckoo clock movement and stick outside of the clock case. Push it down for cuckoo on and up for cuckoo shut off usually. Just move it to the opposite direction and see if the clock will strike out the cuckoo calls. If the movement has a silence switch that does not stick outside of the case it may still be on the movement itself. Just look at the back of the clock with the back panel off and may see the silence switch. See a lever on the right as facing the back of the movement on the top side. Not all cuckoos have this feature as the manufacturer, silence the cuckoo just by locking the bird door.

Clock chain resistance

Be sure nothing is in the way of the chain that drives the striking side of the cuckoo clock. One weight controls the time and the other the strike. If the chain is rubbing anything like the hole in the bottom of the cuckoo case it will be just like not having enough weight to make it run. The chain that holds the weight should be straight from the ratchet wheel and down without rubbing anything. Also the side of the chain that there is no weight attached to cant be caught up on anything also. This is the side that pull to raise the weight on the other side of the chain loop.

Bellow lift wires in the way

On a new cuckoo clock movement install it is required to bend the lift wires so they do not get caught up on each other. During the travel up to lift the bellows they could be hitting each other and creating resistance. These just get bent this way or that way so they can go up and down with the bellow tops. If the bellow tops is broken or ripped it can cause this to happen also.

Bird arm position

The arm that the bird rests on could be bent in a way that it is trying to go forward too much. Therefore it hits the front of the clock case instead of in a position where it just opens the door. The intent is for it to open the cuckoo door only and not hit the front of the clock case. It will only cuckoo if the bird arm is able to be all the way forward with no resistance.

Cuckoo door opening wire

If this wire is too long it will try to open the bird door too much. With the bird door open too much it will not be able to start the cuckoo strike. The solution is to make the door wire shorter or put a bend in it. Putting a bend in this wire so its sort of a hump instead of straight will be the same thing as making it shorter.

Cuckoo Clock Not Striking Conclusion

If the cuckoo will not go into striking mode is caused by resistance. There is only like 4 or 5 gears that have to spin around to make the clock cuckoo. If there is any resistance for this to happen it will not function. These 4 -5 gears need to spin to have the bellows lift and open the cuckoo door at the same time. There is much action that is dictated by these few gears spinning, any resistance in any part will stop it from working.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Installing cuckoo clock hands

Installing the cuckoo clock hands bought from clockworks.com starts with removing the old hands.

Removing the old cuckoo hands

To remove the cuckoo hands will only need a pair of needle nose pliers. While holding the minute hand still (longer of the two hands) while loosening the minute hand nut with the pliers. Turning the hand nut in the counter clockwise direction while holding the hand still, it will loosen up. Now it can be turned with the fingers only and come right off.

The cuckoo minute hand bushing

With the minute hand off it will expose a round bushing that has a square hole in it. This bushing may or may not come off with the minute hand, in fact it maybe stuck in the hand itself. If the bushing is stuck in the hand just remove it by prying up and off with a flat screwdriver. Hour hand is next and is only a friction fit. Twist it and pull at the same time and it will come off.

Install the hour hand

Hour hand is first by a twist and push at the same time, it is only a friction fit. The tube it goes on is tapered although it may not be noticeable. So the more the hour hand is twisted and pushed down at the same time, the tighter it will be on the clock. Do not worry about having it point to the right time yet, we will do that later. Now put the minute hand on (the longer of the two hands). Put this on the bushing and the ridges will somewhat lock it into place in the hole of the hand. Next is the hand nut on the threaded portion of the hand shaft. This will sandwich the minute hand between the bushing and its nut. Now it’s time to set the hands to point to the correct time when the clock cuckoo’s.

Install the minute hand

Next put the brass bushing with the square hole in it, on the clocks hand shaft arbor’s square portion. The flat side of the hand bushing will go toward the clock dial. The side with the ridge on it will point outward.

Setting the cuckoo strike

After the install of the cuckoo clock minute hand we need them to point to the right place. Putting the hands in a position to point to the right place when it cuckoos the hour. Put the clock up on the wall and turn the minute hand to make the clock cuckoo out the top of the hour. Count the number of cuckoo’s the clock sounds out and point the hour hand to that number. For example, if there were 6 cuckoos point the hour hand to the six. The minute hand gets loosened some and turned to the 12 to represent the top of the hour. Tighten the minute hand nut while holding it still at the 12. Now just check the next hour and see if it will point to the correct spots when it cuckoos again.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Cuckoo Strike Quantity Issues

Issues with the strike quantity on a cuckoo clock is a common ailment upon setting up a new movement. The clock will strike 12 o’clock and then 12 again at 1 o’clock or something like this. This has to do with the mechanical components behind the clock dial. Remove the hands and dial to get to that section of the cuckoo movement.

Remove the hands

To remove the cuckoo hands a pair of needle nose pliers are needed. Hold the minute hand still (longer of the two hands) while loosening the minute hand nut. Once the nut is loose, just turn to the left until it is off. Then the minute hand will come off with its round bushing that has a square hole in it. Remove the bushing out of the minute hand when it’s off of the clock. It is only a friction fit, just push it out or pry it out of the hand with a flat screwdriver. Hour hand is only a friction fit so twist it and pull.

Remove the dial

Removing the dial is done after the hands are off. There is anywhere between 2 and 4 small nails holding the cuckoo dial on the clock. Sometimes, on rare occasions, the dial is glued to the clock case. Either way, it is the same method to remove the dial. Take a small flat head screwdriver and lift gently on the dial on one side and then the other until little by little it will come up and off the case.

Component description

Once the dial is off of the clock please notice the saw tooth rack. The rack looks like a saw with sharp teeth and it flops up and down in the front of the movement. It falls down on a snail looking thing that is on the same tube as the hour hand. In other words the smaller of the two hands that points out the hour is also on this same tube as the snail. A rack and snail count system these components determine how many times it will cuckoo each hour.

How it works

There are at least 12 saw looking teeth on the rack, one tooth per hour totaling at least 12. The rack will fall onto the portions of the snail then moves back up one tooth at a time. Each tooth that climbs back up lets the strike train run for that time duration. That time duration of the strike wheels spinning will allow the clock to cuckoo one time. The lowest portion of the snails humps would be 12 strikes for 12 o'clock. This is because the lowest hump on the snail will expose 12 teeth on the rack.

Correcting Cuckoo Strike Quantity Issues

If there is any Cuckoo Strike Quantity Issues, the issue is in this area. The best thing to do is to make it strike over and over as looking at these components in action. There is usually no parts to buy to fix this and it’s usually just a matter of tweaking something here or there to let the rack fall as it should and when it should. Something to note is that if it strikes ONE and TWELVE ok, then the snail is on correctly and the rest of the hours will automatically be ok. So the goal is to be sure the clock strikes the 12 times ok and then the one o’clock also. This will solve the Cuckoo Strike Quantity Issues.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Cuckoo clock door stuck open

Upon installation of a new cuckoo clock movement this is a common issue. The Cuckoo clock door stuck open could be a number of things. Please check the following to see if it solves the issue of the door not closing all the way.

Weights not heavy enough

If the pine cone weight that controls the cuckoo portion of the clock is not heavy enough this can be the issue. Pull down some on the currently used weight and see if the door shuts. If the below issues are checked, and the door only shuts when pulling the weight down, consider adding a heavier weight. It maybe the wrong pine cone weight to begin with.

Needs Oil

The cuckoo clock movement may need oiling at least on the arms that make the bird go in and out of its house. Also, it is good to put a drop of clock oil on the door hinges and the connections for the wire that goes from the bird to the door.

Bending the door wire

Try bending up the wire that goes from the bird to the Cuckoo clock door. If putting an upward hump of a bend in this wire, it will basically be the same as shortening this wire. With a bent or shortened wire, the bird will not come out as far, but also the bird will pull the door shut more when it goes back in the clock case to sleep.

Bird wires bent

The arm that pushes the arm to make the bird come out, may need to get bent inward some. This may be tricky to see or get to, but sometimes there is a small side door on the side of the cuckoo clock case that can open and see this wire, or arm, that pushes the arm that connects to the bird. Other times there is no door on the side of the case and need to do it from the back of the movement by taking the back panel off of the cuckoo case.

Correcting a bent bird wire

When looking at the back of the movement, this arm will be in a horizontal direction on the back right hand side of the clock movement. Right as looking at the back of the movement that is. In some cuckoos this is even trickier to see or adjust as the right hand bellow tube maybe in the way and has to be removed. Locate this horizontal wire that is in the approximate middle of the movement, located on the strike train side, this is the wire that can get bent. This bending in of the wire more into the movement, will in turn make the door come out more. If bent out some toward the case side, will allow the bird to go in more and therefore the door will shut more.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Disconnecting the bellows

The lift wires travel from the movement up to the flaps of the old bellow tops. Furthermore, these wires are taken off in order to remove the cuckoo bellows. Usually this is done by opening the loop on the lower end of the lift wire. This is where it connects to the movement's lift arm. Use a small flat head screwdriver to twist open the loop on the wire.

Removing the cuckoo bellows

Usually, one flat head screw holds the bellow tops in the clock. The screw goes into the bellow tube. This would be on the side of the cuckoo clock case. Subsequently, each side has a bellow tube and therefore each side has a screw. This is providing the bellows do not have adhesive on them. Once the screw is out of the tube, pry it off with a small screwdriver. Generally speaking, use the screwdriver because there is still one small nail holding it in place. It is most certainly small enough so it simply pops off. As always, be careful not to damage the clock case when doing these things.

Installing the cuckoo wires

The first step is to install the eye loop wire into the new bellow tops. In essence, in the same manner as the old ones. Second, drill a small pilot hole into the Cuckoo Clock Bellow Tops. Shove the eye loop into the hole with needle nose pliers. Next work on the bird tail lift wire. Mount the bird tail lift wire the exact same way. It is best to get the cuckoo clock wire assortment with the tops. This way, there will be extra wires in case one breaks or twists.

Removing old cuckoo bellow tops

The old cuckoo bellow tops will just snap off the tubes. The top of the tube will have some old glue stuck which has to be carefully cleaned off with a knife. Just carefully scrape it off until it is smooth. This way it has a nice, flat surface for the new tops to be installed. New epoxy will be needed as well for the installation of the new tops. Clear 5 minute epoxy mixes A with B and is great for this project. The regular epoxy is also fine. Any epoxy that dries fast will do the job. After all, it doesn't have to be anything fancy. With the tops scraped smooth, the epoxy will adhere well. If old epoxy is leftover, the bumps will make the new tops not stick as well.

Installing new cuckoo bellow tops

When the new tops are epoxied, either place them upside down to dry or clamp them. Clamping them is the best, however if you do not have them then turning them upside down is the next option. Most importantly, the bellows have to be able to open without resistance. This means there needs to be a gap between the closed flap of the bellow top and the front of the tube. If this small gap is not there, the bellow will jam on the side of the clock case upon opening. The top needs to be in the exact position as the old one was. As a result, it will be able to blow air into the hole that is in the top of the tube. This is so it will not rub anything.

Cuckoo clock hands

Hour and minute hand for post 1950 cuckoo clocks. The hands are measured by the minute hand length from the center of the mounting hole to the end. The hour hand comes with the set of hands and does not get measured. The minute hand should reach to the outside of the numeral for the length measuring. These hands can be trimmed down with scissors if needed for a perfect fit. These hands do not come with the minute hand bushing or the hand nut. These items are sold separate.

Cuckoo hands installation

The hour hand goes on first as a friction fit. The more it is pushed and twisted at once toward the dial the tighter it will be. The minute hand bushing is next to go onto its square post. Now the minute hand gets mounted to the cuckoo bushing as it is held in place while one of the washers can go on top of the minute hand next. The minute hand with its bushing along with the washer from this kit, now all gets squashed by the nut.

Compatibility note

These hands are for cuckoo clocks made post 1950. Before this date we cannot guarantee these hands will work for your cuckoo clock.

Cuckoo on time trick

Now the cuckoo hands are on the clock however it will not point to the right place when it cuckoo calls the hours. First step is to make it cuckoo. Now point the hour hand to whatever hour it just cuckoo called. The minute hand is next to deal with, because it is only sandwiched in between the cuckoo bushing and hand nut, it can be moved. Move the minute hand to whatever hour it cuckoo called out and then tighten the nut finger tight. Use needle nose pliers to snug it up some more. The clock is done, now it is time to set the clock to the proper time and enjoy.

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Anniversary Clock Blocks/Fork

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Blocks and Fork

These are the Anniversary Clock Blocks/Fork that need to be on the suspension spring of an Anniversary clock. The suspension spring is the most common thing that you will need to replace. They break and kink which makes the rotation of the ball assembly cease to function. To replace the suspension spring, remove the old bottom and top blocks and the fork. This way these items can be put onto the new spring. When the spring breaks it is not uncommon for the bottom block to go missing. It might be a good idea to have some extra bottom blocks on hand in case this happens. We carry all of these pieces and many other Anniversary clock necessities.


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Clock Weight Top Hook Kit

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Mechanical Grandfather Clock Weights offered in a variety of ways. Get any part of the weight or the weight complete for your clock, using the weight chart
Clock WeightsWeights DescriptionWeights stuck highHermle Weight SpecsUrgos Weight SpecsKieninger Weight SpecsChanging a Cable
Please view these information tabs to learn about our Mechanical Grandfather Clock Weights

Grandfather Clock Weights Description

The Grandfather Clock Weights Description on this web page will cover what is meant by weights and their parts. Any part of the weight is available on its own. We also offer complete weights. If needing a complete clock weight, we need to determine what the appropriate weight is for the clock. This requires getting the information off of the back plate of the brass movement itself. This information will not be on any of the paperwork or clock case. Once the movement number is known, cross reference that with the weight chart. The other piece of information that is needed is the diameter of the bob. The bob is the round disk at the bottom of the pendulum.

The weight chart

Before using the chart, it is needed to know who made the clock movement. This can be deceiving because the movement can have any name on it, but it may not be the true maker. For example, a Hermle unit may have the name Sligh, Ridgeway, Howard Miller and so on. The numbers on the movement is what will lead to getting the correct manufacturer of the movement not the names on the movement. The stamp with these numbers are right on the back plate. Use the movement identification page to find out who made it. Once the manufacturer is known and the starting numbers of the movement, use the chart to see the weight specifications for the Grandfather clock weights.

Avoiding the weight chart

There is also another way to go about this task, which may be easier. If the movement was made in Germany, post WW2, we can safely make the following assumptions. If the movement is square and chain driven, it will require [email protected] lbs and [email protected] lbs. These are available in either 47mm or 43mm diameters.

If the pendulum bob is 8 1/2 inches or more, change that rule to [email protected] lbs and [email protected] in 47mm or 43mm. A movement that is rectangle in either chain or cable will use [email protected] and [email protected] LBS in 60mm diameter. This changes to [email protected] and [email protected] in 60mm diameter if the pendulum bob is 8 1/2 inches or wider. These specifications do not apply if the clock has 5 or 9 big tubes on the back. Also this rule is not for all Grandfather clock weights but the vast majority of the post WW2 German units.

Close enough is good enough

The weight specs list it as 4.7 or 6.6, however this is really being too picky. If getting it close to those numbers that is fine. In fact if ordering a 4.7 lb weight, it may come 5.3 or whatever, but that is just fine. There has to be some sort of reference for the factory to label the Grandfather clock weights so it is what it is. Just know if it is a pound over that is fine. If it's a little under, that is fine also. They do not have to be exact.

Often wrong from the start

In fact, there is a lot of clocks in the world sold new with the wrong Clock Weights on them from the start. Clockworks will do a repair and they will say the clock ran for 30 years straight and come to find out they had Grandfather clock weights that were a pound or two too heavy. If the weights are a little too heavy it is fine. A lighter weight may or may not be fine because it may not trigger the movement to work as designed.

Grandfather Clock Weights Description - Conclusion

Grandfather clock Weights are not cheap mainly because they are so heavy to keep, ship, store, move from here to there. Sure one weight set of three is less than 30 lbs but that adds up quickly in a stack of weight sets. With that said, we don't want to ship these back and forth. It is best to get the right weights the first time. To return these is not an inexpensive or easy task. For example, suppose we charge $30 to ship these. They are wrong for some reason it's now $40 to get it back and another $30 to reship. UPS charges a fee to send a call tag for them to come back. That is $110 to UPS for no reason. So if there are questions, please ask.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Grandfather Clock Weights Stuck

The Grandfather clock weights can get stuck in the high position if over wound. Some larger clocks have over wind protection to prevent this. The grandmother and grandfather chain drive units often do not have this feature. When winding the weights up make sure the top of the weight can be seen when done. Never go to the point where the top of the shiny weight cover cant be seen.

Chime weight stuck

The chime weight is on the right as you face the clock and has the heaviest weight. Using cloth gloves, or at least a cloth of some kind, pull down on the weight some. This is the same as making the weight weigh more. At the same time, turn the minute hand past the quarter hour to see if it will engage the chime. When you advance the time and make it chime, the weight will slowly come down. This will hopefully be enough to activate and run the chime on its own.

Time weight stuck

The time weight is the center weight which can be light or heavy depending on bob size. This is the hardest weight to deal with out of the three. Try pulling down some while swinging the pendulum. See if it starts running on its own when letting go. If this does not work, take off the pendulum. All it will have is the pendulum leader hanging on the back of the movement.

This will make it tick tock faster than if the pendulum was on. The leader will tick tock faster as you pull down some on the weight. The weight will then come down enough to run the clock. If all else fails, and it’s a chain driven clock, you would need to cut the chain in half, or break a link, to take the movement out of the clock. With the movement out of the clock it can be fixed.

Strike weight stuck

The strike weight is on the left as you face the clock and has the lightest weight. Only after the chime weight is operating correctly can you work on the strike weight. If the clock does not run through the chime sequence it will not get to where it strikes out the hours. With some cloth gloves on, or at least a cloth of some kind, pull down on the weight some.

Again, this is the same as making the weight weigh more. Doing this will make the clock strike. Advance the minute hand and let it chime each quarter until it plays the top of the hour song. Then pull a little on the weight when it’s supposed to strike out the hours. Keep advancing the time with the minute hand, as to make it chime and strike. Then slowly the weight will come down enough to be able to activate and run the strike on its own.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020
Hermle clock weight specifications If the pendulum bob is 8.5, or larger, the time weight should be the same as the chime weight instead. (Tubular Bell movements are an exception)
Urgos clock weight specifications If the pendulum bob is 8.5, or larger, the time weight should be the same as the chime weight instead. (Tubular Bell movements are an exception)
Kieninger clock weight specifications If the pendulum bob is 8.5, or larger, the time weight should be the same as the chime weight instead. (Tubular Bell movements are an exception)

Changing a Clock Cable

Changing a clock cable requires the movement to be removed from the clock case. These instructions refer to post WW2 modern grandfather units of German origin, however all makes have a similar method. Swapping the cable is easy. There is a big hole and a little hole on the cable mount. The cable end fits into the big hole, then slides over to seat into the little hole. When locked in, it seats in securely. It's the same basic theme on both ends of the cable, meaning, one slot being in the cable drum itself and the other on the movement.

The cable drum side of the cable

To remove, lift the cable up from the oblong hole on the drum and slide it over to the big side. The cables have ends made of brass attached to them. These get slide over from the small side of the slot on the cable drum to the larger slot. It will then be released and removed from the clock movement.

The other end of the cable

The movement itself would normally have the plates attached for the cable ends. The cables have round brass ends on them and these lock into a plate on the movement. This plate will have a small hole leading to a big hole. To remove the cable it requires only lifting the end and moving over to the big hole and out.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Clock Weight Hook Kit

Brass top Clock Weight Hook Kit for modern German clock movements such as Hermle / Urgos / Kieninger. The top hooks are made a few ways, external threads or internal threads and also M4 threads or M5 threads. The M* number is the thread size of the screw/bolt, M4 is 4mm, M5 is 5mm. Now available here in a pack of three to cover all clock weight possibilities. Prior to offering this kit we did sell them single, however this is no longer the situation. It was just found to be much easier to sell the three pack we offer here, to be sure the right one will be sent. In this top hook kit there is 1 of the M4 internal threads, 1 of the M5 internal threads, and 1 of M5 external threads. With these three top hooks chances are one of these will fit the top of the clock weight.

Clock Weight Hook Kit Removal and Installation

The weight hooks on a clock are removed by turning the hook to the left with needle nose pliers. The old broken hook will unscrew just like any other screw. When it is removed it can be seen if it has external or internal threads. Installation is reverse of removal.


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Cuckoo Clock Bellow Tops

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Post WW2 German cuckoo clock repair parts for the professional or hobbyist. Information on how to install these parts onto a cuckoo clock. - Clockworks
Cuckoo PartsCuckoo parts descriptionIf it will not cuckooInstalling the cuckoo handsCuckoo Strike Quantity IssuesCuckoo Door Stuck OpenReplacing Bellow Tops

Please view these information tabs to help with determining the proper parts for your clock.

Cuckoo repair parts

The most common Cuckoo repair parts sold is the bellow tops and the hands. The bellow tubes are usually good to reuse on the clock, just the bellow tops have cloth that rip over time and therefore the clock will not cuckoo the time out.

Repairing cuckoo bellows

If the cloth is ripped the entire cuckoo bellows do not need to be replaced. The bellow tops only can be used. If just replacing the bellow tops it makes things easier to get the correct size for the clock. To get the proper bellow tops measure the length and width of the top only. Snap off the old tops off of the bellow tubes and clean the surface with a knife, then epoxy the new tops on the same way. Then transfer the cuckoo lift rings from the old tops to the new ones and its done.

Cuckoo Clock Repair

Cuckoo Clock Repair

The help section can help with many of the most common issues the clock may have. We also have the cuckoo clock movements for post 1950 German made units. This is about 80 percent of the cuckoos out in the world so chances are we have the movement needed.

If the movement is worn out and is post 1950 its just as well to get the new one instead of restoring the old one. The process of the movement restoration is time consuming and therefore expensive. When the new movement is 100-200 dollars and will last alot longer than the best restoration.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

New cuckoo clock movement not striking

When the new cuckoo clock movement will not go into striking mode for the hours. The bird will not come out and the clock will not indicate what time it is with the cuckoo call. Here are some guidelines on what to check in this situation.

See if the cuckoo door is latched shut

There is a wire above the cuckoo door that locks it into the closed position. This is for either shipping the clock and also for chime shut off. It is a small wire that stops the door and just gets turned to either in the way or out of the way of the door. Be sure it is out of the way so the door can open and it can cuckoo.

Check the silence lever

There may be a silence lever if the cuckoo movement has one. This would be located on the side of the cuckoo clock movement and stick outside of the clock case. Push it down for cuckoo on and up for cuckoo shut off usually. Just move it to the opposite direction and see if the clock will strike out the cuckoo calls. If the movement has a silence switch that does not stick outside of the case it may still be on the movement itself. Just look at the back of the clock with the back panel off and may see the silence switch. See a lever on the right as facing the back of the movement on the top side. Not all cuckoos have this feature as the manufacturer, silence the cuckoo just by locking the bird door.

Clock chain resistance

Be sure nothing is in the way of the chain that drives the striking side of the cuckoo clock. One weight controls the time and the other the strike. If the chain is rubbing anything like the hole in the bottom of the cuckoo case it will be just like not having enough weight to make it run. The chain that holds the weight should be straight from the ratchet wheel and down without rubbing anything. Also the side of the chain that there is no weight attached to cant be caught up on anything also. This is the side that pull to raise the weight on the other side of the chain loop.

Bellow lift wires in the way

On a new cuckoo clock movement install it is required to bend the lift wires so they do not get caught up on each other. During the travel up to lift the bellows they could be hitting each other and creating resistance. These just get bent this way or that way so they can go up and down with the bellow tops. If the bellow tops is broken or ripped it can cause this to happen also.

Bird arm position

The arm that the bird rests on could be bent in a way that it is trying to go forward too much. Therefore it hits the front of the clock case instead of in a position where it just opens the door. The intent is for it to open the cuckoo door only and not hit the front of the clock case. It will only cuckoo if the bird arm is able to be all the way forward with no resistance.

Cuckoo door opening wire

If this wire is too long it will try to open the bird door too much. With the bird door open too much it will not be able to start the cuckoo strike. The solution is to make the door wire shorter or put a bend in it. Putting a bend in this wire so its sort of a hump instead of straight will be the same thing as making it shorter.

Cuckoo Clock Not Striking Conclusion

If the cuckoo will not go into striking mode is caused by resistance. There is only like 4 or 5 gears that have to spin around to make the clock cuckoo. If there is any resistance for this to happen it will not function. These 4 -5 gears need to spin to have the bellows lift and open the cuckoo door at the same time. There is much action that is dictated by these few gears spinning, any resistance in any part will stop it from working.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Installing cuckoo clock hands

Installing the cuckoo clock hands bought from clockworks.com starts with removing the old hands.

Removing the old cuckoo hands

To remove the cuckoo hands will only need a pair of needle nose pliers. While holding the minute hand still (longer of the two hands) while loosening the minute hand nut with the pliers. Turning the hand nut in the counter clockwise direction while holding the hand still, it will loosen up. Now it can be turned with the fingers only and come right off.

The cuckoo minute hand bushing

With the minute hand off it will expose a round bushing that has a square hole in it. This bushing may or may not come off with the minute hand, in fact it maybe stuck in the hand itself. If the bushing is stuck in the hand just remove it by prying up and off with a flat screwdriver. Hour hand is next and is only a friction fit. Twist it and pull at the same time and it will come off.

Install the hour hand

Hour hand is first by a twist and push at the same time, it is only a friction fit. The tube it goes on is tapered although it may not be noticeable. So the more the hour hand is twisted and pushed down at the same time, the tighter it will be on the clock. Do not worry about having it point to the right time yet, we will do that later. Now put the minute hand on (the longer of the two hands). Put this on the bushing and the ridges will somewhat lock it into place in the hole of the hand. Next is the hand nut on the threaded portion of the hand shaft. This will sandwich the minute hand between the bushing and its nut. Now it’s time to set the hands to point to the correct time when the clock cuckoo’s.

Install the minute hand

Next put the brass bushing with the square hole in it, on the clocks hand shaft arbor’s square portion. The flat side of the hand bushing will go toward the clock dial. The side with the ridge on it will point outward.

Setting the cuckoo strike

After the install of the cuckoo clock minute hand we need them to point to the right place. Putting the hands in a position to point to the right place when it cuckoos the hour. Put the clock up on the wall and turn the minute hand to make the clock cuckoo out the top of the hour. Count the number of cuckoo’s the clock sounds out and point the hour hand to that number. For example, if there were 6 cuckoos point the hour hand to the six. The minute hand gets loosened some and turned to the 12 to represent the top of the hour. Tighten the minute hand nut while holding it still at the 12. Now just check the next hour and see if it will point to the correct spots when it cuckoos again.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Cuckoo Strike Quantity Issues

Issues with the strike quantity on a cuckoo clock is a common ailment upon setting up a new movement. The clock will strike 12 o’clock and then 12 again at 1 o’clock or something like this. This has to do with the mechanical components behind the clock dial. Remove the hands and dial to get to that section of the cuckoo movement.

Remove the hands

To remove the cuckoo hands a pair of needle nose pliers are needed. Hold the minute hand still (longer of the two hands) while loosening the minute hand nut. Once the nut is loose, just turn to the left until it is off. Then the minute hand will come off with its round bushing that has a square hole in it. Remove the bushing out of the minute hand when it’s off of the clock. It is only a friction fit, just push it out or pry it out of the hand with a flat screwdriver. Hour hand is only a friction fit so twist it and pull.

Remove the dial

Removing the dial is done after the hands are off. There is anywhere between 2 and 4 small nails holding the cuckoo dial on the clock. Sometimes, on rare occasions, the dial is glued to the clock case. Either way, it is the same method to remove the dial. Take a small flat head screwdriver and lift gently on the dial on one side and then the other until little by little it will come up and off the case.

Component description

Once the dial is off of the clock please notice the saw tooth rack. The rack looks like a saw with sharp teeth and it flops up and down in the front of the movement. It falls down on a snail looking thing that is on the same tube as the hour hand. In other words the smaller of the two hands that points out the hour is also on this same tube as the snail. A rack and snail count system these components determine how many times it will cuckoo each hour.

How it works

There are at least 12 saw looking teeth on the rack, one tooth per hour totaling at least 12. The rack will fall onto the portions of the snail then moves back up one tooth at a time. Each tooth that climbs back up lets the strike train run for that time duration. That time duration of the strike wheels spinning will allow the clock to cuckoo one time. The lowest portion of the snails humps would be 12 strikes for 12 o'clock. This is because the lowest hump on the snail will expose 12 teeth on the rack.

Correcting Cuckoo Strike Quantity Issues

If there is any Cuckoo Strike Quantity Issues, the issue is in this area. The best thing to do is to make it strike over and over as looking at these components in action. There is usually no parts to buy to fix this and it’s usually just a matter of tweaking something here or there to let the rack fall as it should and when it should. Something to note is that if it strikes ONE and TWELVE ok, then the snail is on correctly and the rest of the hours will automatically be ok. So the goal is to be sure the clock strikes the 12 times ok and then the one o’clock also. This will solve the Cuckoo Strike Quantity Issues.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Cuckoo clock door stuck open

Upon installation of a new cuckoo clock movement this is a common issue. The Cuckoo clock door stuck open could be a number of things. Please check the following to see if it solves the issue of the door not closing all the way.

Weights not heavy enough

If the pine cone weight that controls the cuckoo portion of the clock is not heavy enough this can be the issue. Pull down some on the currently used weight and see if the door shuts. If the below issues are checked, and the door only shuts when pulling the weight down, consider adding a heavier weight. It maybe the wrong pine cone weight to begin with.

Needs Oil

The cuckoo clock movement may need oiling at least on the arms that make the bird go in and out of its house. Also, it is good to put a drop of clock oil on the door hinges and the connections for the wire that goes from the bird to the door.

Bending the door wire

Try bending up the wire that goes from the bird to the Cuckoo clock door. If putting an upward hump of a bend in this wire, it will basically be the same as shortening this wire. With a bent or shortened wire, the bird will not come out as far, but also the bird will pull the door shut more when it goes back in the clock case to sleep.

Bird wires bent

The arm that pushes the arm to make the bird come out, may need to get bent inward some. This may be tricky to see or get to, but sometimes there is a small side door on the side of the cuckoo clock case that can open and see this wire, or arm, that pushes the arm that connects to the bird. Other times there is no door on the side of the case and need to do it from the back of the movement by taking the back panel off of the cuckoo case.

Correcting a bent bird wire

When looking at the back of the movement, this arm will be in a horizontal direction on the back right hand side of the clock movement. Right as looking at the back of the movement that is. In some cuckoos this is even trickier to see or adjust as the right hand bellow tube maybe in the way and has to be removed. Locate this horizontal wire that is in the approximate middle of the movement, located on the strike train side, this is the wire that can get bent. This bending in of the wire more into the movement, will in turn make the door come out more. If bent out some toward the case side, will allow the bird to go in more and therefore the door will shut more.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Disconnecting the bellows

The lift wires travel from the movement up to the flaps of the old bellow tops. Furthermore, these wires are taken off in order to remove the cuckoo bellows. Usually this is done by opening the loop on the lower end of the lift wire. This is where it connects to the movement's lift arm. Use a small flat head screwdriver to twist open the loop on the wire.

Removing the cuckoo bellows

Usually, one flat head screw holds the bellow tops in the clock. The screw goes into the bellow tube. This would be on the side of the cuckoo clock case. Subsequently, each side has a bellow tube and therefore each side has a screw. This is providing the bellows do not have adhesive on them. Once the screw is out of the tube, pry it off with a small screwdriver. Generally speaking, use the screwdriver because there is still one small nail holding it in place. It is most certainly small enough so it simply pops off. As always, be careful not to damage the clock case when doing these things.

Installing the cuckoo wires

The first step is to install the eye loop wire into the new bellow tops. In essence, in the same manner as the old ones. Second, drill a small pilot hole into the Cuckoo Clock Bellow Tops. Shove the eye loop into the hole with needle nose pliers. Next work on the bird tail lift wire. Mount the bird tail lift wire the exact same way. It is best to get the cuckoo clock wire assortment with the tops. This way, there will be extra wires in case one breaks or twists.

Removing old cuckoo bellow tops

The old cuckoo bellow tops will just snap off the tubes. The top of the tube will have some old glue stuck which has to be carefully cleaned off with a knife. Just carefully scrape it off until it is smooth. This way it has a nice, flat surface for the new tops to be installed. New epoxy will be needed as well for the installation of the new tops. Clear 5 minute epoxy mixes A with B and is great for this project. The regular epoxy is also fine. Any epoxy that dries fast will do the job. After all, it doesn't have to be anything fancy. With the tops scraped smooth, the epoxy will adhere well. If old epoxy is leftover, the bumps will make the new tops not stick as well.

Installing new cuckoo bellow tops

When the new tops are epoxied, either place them upside down to dry or clamp them. Clamping them is the best, however if you do not have them then turning them upside down is the next option. Most importantly, the bellows have to be able to open without resistance. This means there needs to be a gap between the closed flap of the bellow top and the front of the tube. If this small gap is not there, the bellow will jam on the side of the clock case upon opening. The top needs to be in the exact position as the old one was. As a result, it will be able to blow air into the hole that is in the top of the tube. This is so it will not rub anything.

Cuckoo Clock Bellow Tops

Cuckoo Clock Bellow Tops are replaced when the bellow cloth is ripped and has a hole. With a hole in the bellow cloth the cuckoo sound will not play correctly. These are sold in a variety of sizes as a pair, and it only has to be matched up by measuring the old ones. Cuckoo clock bellow tops do not have to be the exact size as the old ones. All the bellows have to do is blow air in the tube and not be in the way of anything when it functions. So if the bellows are a little smaller than the old ones it is fine. Sold as a pair.

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German Clock Hand Nuts

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Mechanical Clock Hands are the arms that point to the numbers 1 to 12 so you know what time of day it is. Clock hands come in a variety of lengths.
Mechanical Clock HandsHand RemovalHand InstallationOrdering Mech HandsChime On Time FixAbout Hand Nuts

Please view these information tabs to help with getting the Mechanical Clock Hands.

Removing Mechanical Clock Hands

Removing Mechanical Clock Hands is fast and easy to do. The following are hand removal instructions for German mechanical movements post WW2.

German Post WW2 wall, mantle and floor models

Removing mechanical clock hands for post WW2, mantle and floor clocks is quite simple. Turn the hand nut to the left while holding the minute hand with fingers. Use some small needle nose pliers to loosen the nut first. Once the nut is loose, turn it with fingers until it comes off. Then the minute hand will be able to wiggle straight off its square arbor and off of the clock. The hour hand is a friction fit, so just twist the hour hand back and forth and pull toward you until it comes off. If having a second hand bit, that is only a friction also, so just grab it with fingernails, twist pull off.

American Antique time and strike

These type of movements come in two styles. If there is a minute hand nut, the first style is the same as above. Be very careful not to lose this hand nut. They are very hard to find and replace. The second style of mechanical clock hands will have a pin holding the minute hand on instead of a nut. This pin tapers, meaning it's fat on one side and skinny on the other. Just grab the fat side with needle nose pliers and yank the pin out. The minute hand will fall out with a washer. Save the washer and the tapered pin for ease of reinstalling the hands. If these items happen to get lost, Clockworks offers washers and taper pins for purchase, as well as replacement mechanical clock hands.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

German Mechanical Clock Hand Installation

The installation of the clock hands on a German mechanical movement is reverse of removal. If either the movement was replaced, or the hands are new, the minute hand must be adjusted. This is so it will point to the correct time when it chimes.

Installing the hour hand

First comes the hour hand as a friction fit. Put the hand on its round post and twist and push toward the front front of the dial. Be sure it is not in contact with the dial at any point of its travel in the circle. This includes the base of the hour hand, it cannot rub against the hole in the clock face itself. As its only a friction fit, it can be turned to point to whatever hour it is, just with the fingers.

Installing the minute hand

The minute hand installation is done by putting the square hole in the hand, on the square post of the hand shaft. The bottom of the minute hand cannot be rubbing the hour hand tube or the hour hand. If it is, the hour hand has to be set lower on its tube. With the minute hand on its square post now its time to put the hand nut on. The nut goes on finger tight and then a little bit more with needle nose pliers to make it secure.

Mechanical Clock Hands

The German mechanical clock hands are sold by the time track diameter. When ordering these mechanical clock hands, this measurement is important. To clarify, the dial diameter is the measurement of the time track. This means from just outside the 9 straight across to just outside the 3. For example, if this time track diameter is 6 inches, then select hands for a 6 inch time track in the drop down list. Hands for a 6 inch time track will have a minute hand of about 2 7/8 long from the mounting hole to the end. The proportionally smaller hour hand will come with the minute hand. This is a vastly different way of measuring than the quartz clock hands. So be sure to follow these directions for measuring and not the ones for the quartz hands.

Ordering Hands

After getting the time track diameter measurement, it is time to choose a style for the mechanical clock hand. Under each style of hand, there is a drop down menu. Look to see if the style comes in the size needed for the clock. Not all styles of hands come in the same sizes, so might have to look at the different options available. The most popular styles of mechanical clock hands are the serpentine and spade hands. Remember, the minute hand will come a little less than half of this time track measurement. The hour hand will be proportional in size to the minute hand.

How they are sent

So, when ordering mechanical clock hands, remember that they come as a pair, hour and minute hand. They ship the next business day from Clockworks in Huntington MA USA, via the method is chosen upon checkout.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Mechanical Clock Chime On Time

These are the directions to get a German mechanical clock to chime on time. This means having the clock hands point to the right spot when the clock chimes. When replacing a clock movement, or getting new clock hands, either one, you will notice it will chime 5 minutes before it is supposed to, or 10 min after, something like this. This page explains how to correct this situation. It is unbelievably fast and easy to do.

Working with the minute hand

After a new mechanical movement is installed, or if you are just installing a new set of hands, it maybe noticed the clock will not chime at the time it's supposed to. To correct this, take the minute hand off of the clock. This is the longer of the two hands. With this minute hand off of the clock, turn it upside down and look that it has a square hole where it attaches to the clock. This square hole is in a bushing that will rotate WITHIN the minute hand itself.

The correction

So, all to be done is just use needle nose pliers to turn this bushing ever so slightly. Put the hand back on the clock and see if it’s pointing to the correct place where it chimed. If it is, then it all set and it will point to the exact place it is supposed too. If it is still not right, take the hand off and try again. Once you get the minute hand to point where it just chimed you then set to the correct time.

The conclusion

It is really that easy, there is nothing to do with the clock itself, only the minute hand. In other words, to put it in a silly way, take the minute hand off of the clock and walk to the garage with it. Take it far, far away from the clock. When in your garage take needle nose pliers and turn the bushing within the hand itself. Then walk back to the clock and put it on. See if it's now pointing to the right spot.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Mechanical clock hand nuts

One of the most common parts a Mechanical clock needs is the hand nut. As previously stated, the older the clock the harder things are to find. The hand nuts Clockworks offer are for movements made after the 1930's.

Prior to 1930 clock hand nuts

There were not many standards on what the hand nut size should be on the early clocks. However, prior to around 1930 there is no telling what will work. In other words, it is literally trial and error. There was no standard hand nut size. Any hand nut we offer, may, or may not, work. This includes cuckoo hand nuts, American clock hand nuts, or German hand nuts. However, with even all of these assortments, there is a chance none of them will work on the clock.

Post 1930 clock hand nuts

Generally speaking, what we have to offer in the three types of clock hand nuts will cover most of the post 1930 Mechanical clocks. The cuckoo hand nuts fit about 80% of the post war German made cuckoo clocks. The American clock hand nuts fit many of the mechanical time strikes that were so popular. German hand nuts fit most post war German made mechanical clocks, with the exception being a few large grandfather clocks.

Clocks that do not take a hand nut

Not all clocks require a hand nut. Some antique mechanical clocks require a clock hand washer and a tapered pin instead. These secure the minute hand as an alternative to the hand nut. The washer may have a small square hole, or large, oblong or round hole. Clockworks offers an assortment of 100 clock hand washers that includes all the styles mentioned. A tapered pin is used to secure the hand with the washer on top of it. The taper pin is inserted into a hole in the end of the minute hand arbor to secure the washer and minute hand to the clock. A taper pin is a small brass or steel rod that is wide on one end and skinny on the other. Clockworks offers them in an assortment of 100 to ensure the right one is there.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020
Clock Hand Measurement

German Clock Hand Nuts

German clock hand nuts for post 1950 clock movements. Fits Hermle, Kieninger, Urgos, Jauch and more. However these hand nuts will not work on a cuckoo clock. Cuckoo clock hand nuts are available on the cuckoo parts page.


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Serpentine Mechanical Clock Hands

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Mechanical Clock Hands are the arms that point to the numbers 1 to 12 so you know what time of day it is. Clock hands come in a variety of lengths.
Mechanical Clock HandsHand RemovalHand InstallationOrdering Mech HandsChime On Time FixAbout Hand Nuts

Please view these information tabs to help with getting the Mechanical Clock Hands.

Removing Mechanical Clock Hands

Removing Mechanical Clock Hands is fast and easy to do. The following are hand removal instructions for German mechanical movements post WW2.

German Post WW2 wall, mantle and floor models

Removing mechanical clock hands for post WW2, mantle and floor clocks is quite simple. Turn the hand nut to the left while holding the minute hand with fingers. Use some small needle nose pliers to loosen the nut first. Once the nut is loose, turn it with fingers until it comes off. Then the minute hand will be able to wiggle straight off its square arbor and off of the clock. The hour hand is a friction fit, so just twist the hour hand back and forth and pull toward you until it comes off. If having a second hand bit, that is only a friction also, so just grab it with fingernails, twist pull off.

American Antique time and strike

These type of movements come in two styles. If there is a minute hand nut, the first style is the same as above. Be very careful not to lose this hand nut. They are very hard to find and replace. The second style of mechanical clock hands will have a pin holding the minute hand on instead of a nut. This pin tapers, meaning it's fat on one side and skinny on the other. Just grab the fat side with needle nose pliers and yank the pin out. The minute hand will fall out with a washer. Save the washer and the tapered pin for ease of reinstalling the hands. If these items happen to get lost, Clockworks offers washers and taper pins for purchase, as well as replacement mechanical clock hands.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

German Mechanical Clock Hand Installation

The installation of the clock hands on a German mechanical movement is reverse of removal. If either the movement was replaced, or the hands are new, the minute hand must be adjusted. This is so it will point to the correct time when it chimes.

Installing the hour hand

First comes the hour hand as a friction fit. Put the hand on its round post and twist and push toward the front front of the dial. Be sure it is not in contact with the dial at any point of its travel in the circle. This includes the base of the hour hand, it cannot rub against the hole in the clock face itself. As its only a friction fit, it can be turned to point to whatever hour it is, just with the fingers.

Installing the minute hand

The minute hand installation is done by putting the square hole in the hand, on the square post of the hand shaft. The bottom of the minute hand cannot be rubbing the hour hand tube or the hour hand. If it is, the hour hand has to be set lower on its tube. With the minute hand on its square post now its time to put the hand nut on. The nut goes on finger tight and then a little bit more with needle nose pliers to make it secure.

Mechanical Clock Hands

The German mechanical clock hands are sold by the time track diameter. When ordering these mechanical clock hands, this measurement is important. To clarify, the dial diameter is the measurement of the time track. This means from just outside the 9 straight across to just outside the 3. For example, if this time track diameter is 6 inches, then select hands for a 6 inch time track in the drop down list. Hands for a 6 inch time track will have a minute hand of about 2 7/8 long from the mounting hole to the end. The proportionally smaller hour hand will come with the minute hand. This is a vastly different way of measuring than the quartz clock hands. So be sure to follow these directions for measuring and not the ones for the quartz hands.

Ordering Hands

After getting the time track diameter measurement, it is time to choose a style for the mechanical clock hand. Under each style of hand, there is a drop down menu. Look to see if the style comes in the size needed for the clock. Not all styles of hands come in the same sizes, so might have to look at the different options available. The most popular styles of mechanical clock hands are the serpentine and spade hands. Remember, the minute hand will come a little less than half of this time track measurement. The hour hand will be proportional in size to the minute hand.

How they are sent

So, when ordering mechanical clock hands, remember that they come as a pair, hour and minute hand. They ship the next business day from Clockworks in Huntington MA USA, via the method is chosen upon checkout.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Mechanical Clock Chime On Time

These are the directions to get a German mechanical clock to chime on time. This means having the clock hands point to the right spot when the clock chimes. When replacing a clock movement, or getting new clock hands, either one, you will notice it will chime 5 minutes before it is supposed to, or 10 min after, something like this. This page explains how to correct this situation. It is unbelievably fast and easy to do.

Working with the minute hand

After a new mechanical movement is installed, or if you are just installing a new set of hands, it maybe noticed the clock will not chime at the time it's supposed to. To correct this, take the minute hand off of the clock. This is the longer of the two hands. With this minute hand off of the clock, turn it upside down and look that it has a square hole where it attaches to the clock. This square hole is in a bushing that will rotate WITHIN the minute hand itself.

The correction

So, all to be done is just use needle nose pliers to turn this bushing ever so slightly. Put the hand back on the clock and see if it’s pointing to the correct place where it chimed. If it is, then it all set and it will point to the exact place it is supposed too. If it is still not right, take the hand off and try again. Once you get the minute hand to point where it just chimed you then set to the correct time.

The conclusion

It is really that easy, there is nothing to do with the clock itself, only the minute hand. In other words, to put it in a silly way, take the minute hand off of the clock and walk to the garage with it. Take it far, far away from the clock. When in your garage take needle nose pliers and turn the bushing within the hand itself. Then walk back to the clock and put it on. See if it's now pointing to the right spot.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Mechanical clock hand nuts

One of the most common parts a Mechanical clock needs is the hand nut. As previously stated, the older the clock the harder things are to find. The hand nuts Clockworks offer are for movements made after the 1930's.

Prior to 1930 clock hand nuts

There were not many standards on what the hand nut size should be on the early clocks. However, prior to around 1930 there is no telling what will work. In other words, it is literally trial and error. There was no standard hand nut size. Any hand nut we offer, may, or may not, work. This includes cuckoo hand nuts, American clock hand nuts, or German hand nuts. However, with even all of these assortments, there is a chance none of them will work on the clock.

Post 1930 clock hand nuts

Generally speaking, what we have to offer in the three types of clock hand nuts will cover most of the post 1930 Mechanical clocks. The cuckoo hand nuts fit about 80% of the post war German made cuckoo clocks. The American clock hand nuts fit many of the mechanical time strikes that were so popular. German hand nuts fit most post war German made mechanical clocks, with the exception being a few large grandfather clocks.

Clocks that do not take a hand nut

Not all clocks require a hand nut. Some antique mechanical clocks require a clock hand washer and a tapered pin instead. These secure the minute hand as an alternative to the hand nut. The washer may have a small square hole, or large, oblong or round hole. Clockworks offers an assortment of 100 clock hand washers that includes all the styles mentioned. A tapered pin is used to secure the hand with the washer on top of it. The taper pin is inserted into a hole in the end of the minute hand arbor to secure the washer and minute hand to the clock. A taper pin is a small brass or steel rod that is wide on one end and skinny on the other. Clockworks offers them in an assortment of 100 to ensure the right one is there.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020
Clock Hand Measurement

Serpentine Mechanical Clock Hands

This is a set of Serpentine Mechanical Clock Hands that fit most German mechanical clock movements made after 1950. The hands are measured by the time track diameter. A time track is the small ring outside of the numerals and the minute hand length will be about half this diameter. The hour hand is included and of course shorter. The minute hand has a 2.2mm square mounting hole, the hour hand has a 4.5mm round hole.

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Cuckoo Clock Weights

Posted on    Posted in  turned_in_not  
Post WW2 German cuckoo clock repair parts for the professional or hobbyist. Information on how to install these parts onto a cuckoo clock. - Clockworks
Cuckoo PartsCuckoo parts descriptionIf it will not cuckooInstalling the cuckoo handsCuckoo Strike Quantity IssuesCuckoo Door Stuck OpenReplacing Bellow Tops

Please view these information tabs to help with determining the proper parts for your clock.

Cuckoo repair parts

The most common Cuckoo repair parts sold is the bellow tops and the hands. The bellow tubes are usually good to reuse on the clock, just the bellow tops have cloth that rip over time and therefore the clock will not cuckoo the time out.

Repairing cuckoo bellows

If the cloth is ripped the entire cuckoo bellows do not need to be replaced. The bellow tops only can be used. If just replacing the bellow tops it makes things easier to get the correct size for the clock. To get the proper bellow tops measure the length and width of the top only. Snap off the old tops off of the bellow tubes and clean the surface with a knife, then epoxy the new tops on the same way. Then transfer the cuckoo lift rings from the old tops to the new ones and its done.

Cuckoo Clock Repair

Cuckoo Clock Repair

The help section can help with many of the most common issues the clock may have. We also have the cuckoo clock movements for post 1950 German made units. This is about 80 percent of the cuckoos out in the world so chances are we have the movement needed.

If the movement is worn out and is post 1950 its just as well to get the new one instead of restoring the old one. The process of the movement restoration is time consuming and therefore expensive. When the new movement is 100-200 dollars and will last alot longer than the best restoration.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

New cuckoo clock movement not striking

When the new cuckoo clock movement will not go into striking mode for the hours. The bird will not come out and the clock will not indicate what time it is with the cuckoo call. Here are some guidelines on what to check in this situation.

See if the cuckoo door is latched shut

There is a wire above the cuckoo door that locks it into the closed position. This is for either shipping the clock and also for chime shut off. It is a small wire that stops the door and just gets turned to either in the way or out of the way of the door. Be sure it is out of the way so the door can open and it can cuckoo.

Check the silence lever

There may be a silence lever if the cuckoo movement has one. This would be located on the side of the cuckoo clock movement and stick outside of the clock case. Push it down for cuckoo on and up for cuckoo shut off usually. Just move it to the opposite direction and see if the clock will strike out the cuckoo calls. If the movement has a silence switch that does not stick outside of the case it may still be on the movement itself. Just look at the back of the clock with the back panel off and may see the silence switch. See a lever on the right as facing the back of the movement on the top side. Not all cuckoos have this feature as the manufacturer, silence the cuckoo just by locking the bird door.

Clock chain resistance

Be sure nothing is in the way of the chain that drives the striking side of the cuckoo clock. One weight controls the time and the other the strike. If the chain is rubbing anything like the hole in the bottom of the cuckoo case it will be just like not having enough weight to make it run. The chain that holds the weight should be straight from the ratchet wheel and down without rubbing anything. Also the side of the chain that there is no weight attached to cant be caught up on anything also. This is the side that pull to raise the weight on the other side of the chain loop.

Bellow lift wires in the way

On a new cuckoo clock movement install it is required to bend the lift wires so they do not get caught up on each other. During the travel up to lift the bellows they could be hitting each other and creating resistance. These just get bent this way or that way so they can go up and down with the bellow tops. If the bellow tops is broken or ripped it can cause this to happen also.

Bird arm position

The arm that the bird rests on could be bent in a way that it is trying to go forward too much. Therefore it hits the front of the clock case instead of in a position where it just opens the door. The intent is for it to open the cuckoo door only and not hit the front of the clock case. It will only cuckoo if the bird arm is able to be all the way forward with no resistance.

Cuckoo door opening wire

If this wire is too long it will try to open the bird door too much. With the bird door open too much it will not be able to start the cuckoo strike. The solution is to make the door wire shorter or put a bend in it. Putting a bend in this wire so its sort of a hump instead of straight will be the same thing as making it shorter.

Cuckoo Clock Not Striking Conclusion

If the cuckoo will not go into striking mode is caused by resistance. There is only like 4 or 5 gears that have to spin around to make the clock cuckoo. If there is any resistance for this to happen it will not function. These 4 -5 gears need to spin to have the bellows lift and open the cuckoo door at the same time. There is much action that is dictated by these few gears spinning, any resistance in any part will stop it from working.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Installing cuckoo clock hands

Installing the cuckoo clock hands bought from clockworks.com starts with removing the old hands.

Removing the old cuckoo hands

To remove the cuckoo hands will only need a pair of needle nose pliers. While holding the minute hand still (longer of the two hands) while loosening the minute hand nut with the pliers. Turning the hand nut in the counter clockwise direction while holding the hand still, it will loosen up. Now it can be turned with the fingers only and come right off.

The cuckoo minute hand bushing

With the minute hand off it will expose a round bushing that has a square hole in it. This bushing may or may not come off with the minute hand, in fact it maybe stuck in the hand itself. If the bushing is stuck in the hand just remove it by prying up and off with a flat screwdriver. Hour hand is next and is only a friction fit. Twist it and pull at the same time and it will come off.

Install the hour hand

Hour hand is first by a twist and push at the same time, it is only a friction fit. The tube it goes on is tapered although it may not be noticeable. So the more the hour hand is twisted and pushed down at the same time, the tighter it will be on the clock. Do not worry about having it point to the right time yet, we will do that later. Now put the minute hand on (the longer of the two hands). Put this on the bushing and the ridges will somewhat lock it into place in the hole of the hand. Next is the hand nut on the threaded portion of the hand shaft. This will sandwich the minute hand between the bushing and its nut. Now it’s time to set the hands to point to the correct time when the clock cuckoo’s.

Install the minute hand

Next put the brass bushing with the square hole in it, on the clocks hand shaft arbor’s square portion. The flat side of the hand bushing will go toward the clock dial. The side with the ridge on it will point outward.

Setting the cuckoo strike

After the install of the cuckoo clock minute hand we need them to point to the right place. Putting the hands in a position to point to the right place when it cuckoos the hour. Put the clock up on the wall and turn the minute hand to make the clock cuckoo out the top of the hour. Count the number of cuckoo’s the clock sounds out and point the hour hand to that number. For example, if there were 6 cuckoos point the hour hand to the six. The minute hand gets loosened some and turned to the 12 to represent the top of the hour. Tighten the minute hand nut while holding it still at the 12. Now just check the next hour and see if it will point to the correct spots when it cuckoos again.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Cuckoo Strike Quantity Issues

Issues with the strike quantity on a cuckoo clock is a common ailment upon setting up a new movement. The clock will strike 12 o’clock and then 12 again at 1 o’clock or something like this. This has to do with the mechanical components behind the clock dial. Remove the hands and dial to get to that section of the cuckoo movement.

Remove the hands

To remove the cuckoo hands a pair of needle nose pliers are needed. Hold the minute hand still (longer of the two hands) while loosening the minute hand nut. Once the nut is loose, just turn to the left until it is off. Then the minute hand will come off with its round bushing that has a square hole in it. Remove the bushing out of the minute hand when it’s off of the clock. It is only a friction fit, just push it out or pry it out of the hand with a flat screwdriver. Hour hand is only a friction fit so twist it and pull.

Remove the dial

Removing the dial is done after the hands are off. There is anywhere between 2 and 4 small nails holding the cuckoo dial on the clock. Sometimes, on rare occasions, the dial is glued to the clock case. Either way, it is the same method to remove the dial. Take a small flat head screwdriver and lift gently on the dial on one side and then the other until little by little it will come up and off the case.

Component description

Once the dial is off of the clock please notice the saw tooth rack. The rack looks like a saw with sharp teeth and it flops up and down in the front of the movement. It falls down on a snail looking thing that is on the same tube as the hour hand. In other words the smaller of the two hands that points out the hour is also on this same tube as the snail. A rack and snail count system these components determine how many times it will cuckoo each hour.

How it works

There are at least 12 saw looking teeth on the rack, one tooth per hour totaling at least 12. The rack will fall onto the portions of the snail then moves back up one tooth at a time. Each tooth that climbs back up lets the strike train run for that time duration. That time duration of the strike wheels spinning will allow the clock to cuckoo one time. The lowest portion of the snails humps would be 12 strikes for 12 o'clock. This is because the lowest hump on the snail will expose 12 teeth on the rack.

Correcting Cuckoo Strike Quantity Issues

If there is any Cuckoo Strike Quantity Issues, the issue is in this area. The best thing to do is to make it strike over and over as looking at these components in action. There is usually no parts to buy to fix this and it’s usually just a matter of tweaking something here or there to let the rack fall as it should and when it should. Something to note is that if it strikes ONE and TWELVE ok, then the snail is on correctly and the rest of the hours will automatically be ok. So the goal is to be sure the clock strikes the 12 times ok and then the one o’clock also. This will solve the Cuckoo Strike Quantity Issues.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Cuckoo clock door stuck open

Upon installation of a new cuckoo clock movement this is a common issue. The Cuckoo clock door stuck open could be a number of things. Please check the following to see if it solves the issue of the door not closing all the way.

Weights not heavy enough

If the pine cone weight that controls the cuckoo portion of the clock is not heavy enough this can be the issue. Pull down some on the currently used weight and see if the door shuts. If the below issues are checked, and the door only shuts when pulling the weight down, consider adding a heavier weight. It maybe the wrong pine cone weight to begin with.

Needs Oil

The cuckoo clock movement may need oiling at least on the arms that make the bird go in and out of its house. Also, it is good to put a drop of clock oil on the door hinges and the connections for the wire that goes from the bird to the door.

Bending the door wire

Try bending up the wire that goes from the bird to the Cuckoo clock door. If putting an upward hump of a bend in this wire, it will basically be the same as shortening this wire. With a bent or shortened wire, the bird will not come out as far, but also the bird will pull the door shut more when it goes back in the clock case to sleep.

Bird wires bent

The arm that pushes the arm to make the bird come out, may need to get bent inward some. This may be tricky to see or get to, but sometimes there is a small side door on the side of the cuckoo clock case that can open and see this wire, or arm, that pushes the arm that connects to the bird. Other times there is no door on the side of the case and need to do it from the back of the movement by taking the back panel off of the cuckoo case.

Correcting a bent bird wire

When looking at the back of the movement, this arm will be in a horizontal direction on the back right hand side of the clock movement. Right as looking at the back of the movement that is. In some cuckoos this is even trickier to see or adjust as the right hand bellow tube maybe in the way and has to be removed. Locate this horizontal wire that is in the approximate middle of the movement, located on the strike train side, this is the wire that can get bent. This bending in of the wire more into the movement, will in turn make the door come out more. If bent out some toward the case side, will allow the bird to go in more and therefore the door will shut more.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Disconnecting the bellows

The lift wires travel from the movement up to the flaps of the old bellow tops. Furthermore, these wires are taken off in order to remove the cuckoo bellows. Usually this is done by opening the loop on the lower end of the lift wire. This is where it connects to the movement's lift arm. Use a small flat head screwdriver to twist open the loop on the wire.

Removing the cuckoo bellows

Usually, one flat head screw holds the bellow tops in the clock. The screw goes into the bellow tube. This would be on the side of the cuckoo clock case. Subsequently, each side has a bellow tube and therefore each side has a screw. This is providing the bellows do not have adhesive on them. Once the screw is out of the tube, pry it off with a small screwdriver. Generally speaking, use the screwdriver because there is still one small nail holding it in place. It is most certainly small enough so it simply pops off. As always, be careful not to damage the clock case when doing these things.

Installing the cuckoo wires

The first step is to install the eye loop wire into the new bellow tops. In essence, in the same manner as the old ones. Second, drill a small pilot hole into the Cuckoo Clock Bellow Tops. Shove the eye loop into the hole with needle nose pliers. Next work on the bird tail lift wire. Mount the bird tail lift wire the exact same way. It is best to get the cuckoo clock wire assortment with the tops. This way, there will be extra wires in case one breaks or twists.

Removing old cuckoo bellow tops

The old cuckoo bellow tops will just snap off the tubes. The top of the tube will have some old glue stuck which has to be carefully cleaned off with a knife. Just carefully scrape it off until it is smooth. This way it has a nice, flat surface for the new tops to be installed. New epoxy will be needed as well for the installation of the new tops. Clear 5 minute epoxy mixes A with B and is great for this project. The regular epoxy is also fine. Any epoxy that dries fast will do the job. After all, it doesn't have to be anything fancy. With the tops scraped smooth, the epoxy will adhere well. If old epoxy is leftover, the bumps will make the new tops not stick as well.

Installing new cuckoo bellow tops

When the new tops are epoxied, either place them upside down to dry or clamp them. Clamping them is the best, however if you do not have them then turning them upside down is the next option. Most importantly, the bellows have to be able to open without resistance. This means there needs to be a gap between the closed flap of the bellow top and the front of the tube. If this small gap is not there, the bellow will jam on the side of the clock case upon opening. The top needs to be in the exact position as the old one was. As a result, it will be able to blow air into the hole that is in the top of the tube. This is so it will not rub anything.

Cuckoo Clock Weights

Cuckoo clock weights are in the form of pine cones. They are sold in gram weight and this gram amount is usually stamped on the weight itself. Cuckoo clocks all take the same weight for all the chains with only a few exceptions. The exceptions being multiple animation on some 8 day cuckoo clocks and so it is not the usual situation. If a clock weight is missing all that is needed is to match the same gram amount of another weight that goes to the same clock.

Cuckoo identification in summery

The Regula cuckoo clock company of Germany has produced by far the most cuckoo movements post 1950 than any other factory. In fact it would be about 80 percent chance that if someone has a cuckoo clock made after 1950 it would be Regula. The clock can be made by any name of any German maker of cuckoo clocks, however it will still be a Regula cuckoo clock movement. This is because they made movements for many producers of clock cases.

Regula clock weights specifications

Regula cuckoo clock movements are easy to identify. On the back of the movement stamped in the brass back plate it will say Regula. If the cuckoo clock is made after 1950 it is a good chance it is Regula. They produce one day cuckoo clocks and 8 day cuckoo clocks. These clocks can have either two or three cuckoo clock weights on the clock. Regula one day units take 2 or 3 weights and calls for 275 gram weights by default. Regula 8 day cuckoo clocks take 2 or 3 cuckoo clock weights that are 1260 grams by default. However on the 8 day cuckoos the factory at one point changed the default cuckoo clock weights amount from 1260 grams to 1500 grams eventually.

Deviating from the specifications

A post 1950 cuckoo clock made by Regula has the clock movement still available brand new. The movements get replaced and not repaired and bushed. This is mentioned because it is not such a bad thing to add a little more weight than what the above is calling for. To put 320 gram cuckoo clock weights on a one day cuckoo that is supposed to take 275 gram cuckoo clock weights is sometimes a good idea.

When to add heavier weights

To get a few more years out of the clock before replacing the movement is reasonable and not taboo in this situation. In fact as mentioned previously even the factory went from 1260 to 1500 on the 8 day cuckoos themselves. So if the clock is close to its end anyway and a replacement movement needs to be postponed it maybe a good thing to have heavier cuckoo clock weights. It can make the movement run for a few years before swapping the movement out is absolutely required for it to function.

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Round Convex Clock Glass

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The dial to a clock is also sometimes called the face of the clock. It is the part where the numbers are that tell you the time of day.
All about clock dialsDials and NumeralsDial DrillingAbout BezelsStyles of DialsClock Crystals
Please view these tabs for information on clock dials that Clockworks offers and all the variations available.

Clock Dials and Numerals

Clockworks offers a variety of shapes and colors of clock dials and numerals. Of course the dials come in round, square, moon top and more. Many of the round dials have a choice of white, ivory or gold.

Create a new dial out of any type of material and then use the numerals to finalize the look. Most of the numerals are plastic, however we do offer two different sizes of gold aluminum numerals. These are generally for Grandmother and Grandfather clocks. The aluminum numbers need to have epoxy to hold them in place. They do not have sticky backs like the plastic numerals. Here are some tips to order the correct clock dial and numerals.

Arabic or Roman Numerals

Clock dials and numerals come in either Roman or Arabic. Roman numerals on dials are the kind that have letters to represent the numbers. For example, the 12 would be XII and five is written as V and so forth. The number 4 was IV in roman numerals, however the new style is IIII. This new style is popular with clock inserts. However, it is also becoming the norm on all dials. Arabic clock numerals are just the regular numbers where 12 is written as 12. Arabic is all numbers and no letters on the clock dial.

Arabic verses Roman clock dial

Sizing and Time Tracks

Dials come in many sizes in an attempt to cover many case styles. The sizes in the list are the overall diameter from side to side for each. Often there is another measurement known as the time track. A time track is the small ring that travels around the just outside of the clock numerals. In other words, the time track is the measurement of the dial from outside the 3 to outside the 9. Clock hands are usually half of the dial diameter. So clock dials and numerals will come in variable sizes to accommodate various case styles.

Clock Dials and Numerals - Types of clocks

Use these clock numerals on any type of clock dials providing the size is correct and it looks appropriate. We recommend using extra epoxy on the sticky numerals because they tend to fall off easily. The hardest clocks to find a dial for are the antique mantle clocks. These take a bezel and glass combination that often installs on the dial itself. Use best judgement on what clock dials and numerals look best.

Clock dial drilling description

The following is a description of drilling a clock dial. Clock dials often only have the center hole for the clock hand post to come through. If using a spring driven mechanical clock movement, need to drill holes in the dial. This is so the clock key will have access through the dial to wind the clock. This hole is typically 3/8 of an inch wide. Drill the holes 3/8 wide in the exact spot where the winding arbor of the movement will be. Only one chance to get it right per dial so make sure to line it up perfectly.

Mark the spot to drill

This can be done by putting the dial over the clock movement while the movement is on its back. Place the dial over the movement so the hand shaft is in the center of the hole. At this point there are two options to mark the exact spot to drill. First method is to squeeze a marker between the movement and the dial back side. Mark the back of the dial where the winding arbor will be and therefore the spot to drill. Second, which is the easier and more exact way, is if the dial is thin enough push down with the hands so dimples show up in the dial. The downward pressure on the dial forces the winding arbors to make dimples in the thin metal indicating the exact place to drill.

Dial key hole grommets

A dial grommet is a decorative ring that sits inside the winding hole to make it look pretty. Of course, it is a metal ring with prongs on the back to fold behind the clock dial. Thus, mounting the grommet is via friction fit only. Dial grommets have a 3/8 hole in the center. In some rare situations it is 1/2 inch, however these are for very large tall case clock applications only.

Clock Dial Drilling Service

Hire Clockworks to drill the dial before it ships out. Naturally, Clockworks can drill this before shipping for a fee. So if this is of interest, please email us. We would need the movement numbers off of the back plate of the movement itself. This information would not be in the paperwork that came with the clock or any marking on the wood clock case. It must come from the brass clockworks itself. Once we have the movement number, we can drill the winding arbor holes before the dial ships.

Clock Bezels Description

A clock bezel description consists of the brass part that holds the clock glass in place. It can be confusing to get the bezel and then the flat or convex glass. To buy the clock bezel and then try to get the correct glass separately to put them all together is not easy. It is best to get the clock bezel glass and dial all together whenever possible. To get the correct clock bezel, measure the diameter of the hole in the clock where it will sit. These come in either hinged or not hinged, the hinged version is getting increasingly difficult to supply.

However, there are only a certain number of available sizes for these complete clock bezel units. So even though it is never a recommendation to piece meal the parts, sometimes it is a necessity. Occasionally individual components need to be bought and then match them all together. This can get tricky, so call and speak to us directly. That way we can marry the two items together for the perfect clock bezel and glass combination. However, it is also entirely possible that the combination cannot happen. This is especially true with larger clock bezels.

Fitting glass to the bezel

The glass has to fit into the clock bezel and it has to be a perfect fit. It cannot be too small so as to fall out of the clock bezel and not so big it will not fit into the bezel clips. For the proper size glass, measure exactly how wide the glass would need to be from the back of the bezel. In other words, turn the bezel over and measure across the inside lip of the clock bezel where the glass sits. Remember, the glass tabs have to secure it in place. Get one that will not be too big for the bezel clips and not so small it falls out the front. Again, if there is any question, please feel free to email us or call.

Clock Dial Description of Styles

When creating clocks it is a good idea to know all the options for the dial before deciding what clock to build. The dial is both the most important thing and also the most tricky at times when building a clock. It is most important because that is what people look at all day long. The dial makes or breaks the clock appearance. It is tricky because often what a customer wants for a project is no longer available. However the reverse is what needs to happen. Choices are from what is currently available and not so much what a customer really wants. This availability depends on the clock. For example, a floor clock has more dial options than a school house clock. The list below are the general types of dials available.

Paper Clock dial Description

The paper dials come square but have a round time track. It can be left as a square or it can be cut into a circle for a round dial application. Use spray glue to stick the paper stock dial onto a thin board or metal backing. These are quite versatile for a variety of clock types. Because they come in so many sizes and also available in ivory or white, paper dials are a popular choice. If you need an exact size or an off size that is unavailable, these are a great solution.

Round clock dial Description

The round metal dials may come with a protective plastic coating. Sometimes it is hard to tell it is there so if the dial seems to have scratches, it most likely has this coating. This needs to be taken off for the final clock project. Made of thin metal, it is possible to drill these out with holes for a clock key if working with a spring driven clock. Use dial key hole grommets to make the holes pretty after the drilling is done.

Square clock dials

You can drill Square dials for the winding of a spring driven clock. Drill 3/8 holes where the key will go through the dial to wind the clock. Key hole grommets make the holes look good when done. Usually the metal dials are made from thin metal, and the size and color elections are few. If the size is not available in metal, please consider paper dials instead. These come in many sizes, and are available in white or ivory color, and Roman or Arabic numerals.

Dial with Bezels

A dial and bezel combination is the hardest one to come up with by far. The usual intent is creating an antique mantle clock. This is usually quite frustrating due to lack of availability. To find a dial / glass / bezel / dial pan combination in the right size, with a hinge, in a specific design is not easy. In fact, it is probably impossible. The best thing to do is to choose any other clock style to make. Best to stay clear of mantle clocks that would require this dial style.

Phase of the Moon

The clock moon dials are for floor clocks usually. The standard size is 11 x 15 1/2 inches. So the base of the dial is 11" square and then add a 4 1/2 inch hump on the top for the lunar disk. There are a few other sizes, however this size is the industry standard for the most part. This is a good thing because if your building a clock from kit plans, the odds are very good this dial is the size that they recommend using. For example, the likelihood of obtaining a dial that will be perfect for the project is much higher than trying to build a mantle clock.

Clock Dials and Numerals Info

Clock Crystals - Glass Variations

Let us explore the variety of clock crystals, because the glass does have many variations. The size options are vast, however the shape requirement may not be available in the size that is needed. The first step is to identify if the glass is square, round, oblong or some other odd shape. If the glass is round, need to determine if it is convex or flat. The following paragraphs will clarify each type.

Round Convex Clock Glass Variations

Clockworks offers a large number of sizes in round convex glass. Convex means that the glass has a slight bubble to it. The glass will not be perfectly flat. Sometimes people may say it is concave as well. This type of glass that has a bubble is found on many mantle clocks as well as many other clocks. Clockworks stocks almost every size. In addition, most small sizes are available in 1/16 increments. Please see the product page to see the sizes available and to order the glass.

Ordering is simple once the size that is needed is known. Just select the size from the order button menu. Measure the round convex clock glass from one side to the other. It is the overall diameter of the glass. Do not try to measure the side that has the bubble. Trying to do so will result in the wrong size of glass. Turn it over and measure across the flat side.

When working with a clock bezel it is important to order the right size of clock glass. If the glass is too narrow, it will fall out the front. When a clock glass is too wide, the tabs on the back of the bezel will not be able to fold over to hold it. It needs to be between the extremes. A good fit where the bezel tabs can hold it in place.

Round Flat Clock Glass Variations

Clockworks offers flat round clock glass in many sizes. If the glass needs to be any other size than what we offer, there is a solution. Because it is only flat glass, any local glass shop can cut a circle to whatever size needed. It will not cost much, and as long as the measurement is correct it will be perfect every time. Sometimes just taking the bezel in is enough for a glass shop to cut it.

Square Clock Case Glass

Again, go to the glass shop for this one. Some glass shops will install the glass on the wooden clock case doors if it is left with them. This is the best way. The glass will not be found by any clock part supplier. Bringing it to the glass shop will not cost much. Also there are more options available if changing the look or type of glass.

Clock crystal oddities

During the 1950's through the 1970's there were some unusual clocks made that had odd shapes for the glass. If the clock glass needs to be convex or any other shape besides round, there is not much hope. Unfortunately no clock supplier will have this. Another solution is to find a similar clock and use the glass from it. Again, if flat glass can be made to work, a local glass shop is the way to go.

Round Convex Clock Glass

Measure the round convex clock glass from one side to the other. It is the overall width. When working with a clock bezel it is important to order the right size clock glass. If the glass is too narrow it will fall out the front of the bezel. When a clock glass is too wide, the tabs on the back of the bezel will not be able to fold over to hold it. It needs to be between these two extremes and fit nice and be held in by the bezel tabs.

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Pendulum Suspension Spring Rods

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Clock Pendulum Parts for the mechanical clock pendulum assembly are offered on this webpage, such as bobs and suspension springs.
Pendulum PartsDefinitionsMissing partsLength infoTimingSuspension infoSuspension InstallLeader infoTop Hook info
Please view these information tabs to learn more about replacing clock pendulum parts.

Clock pendulum components description

Altogether, this is a description of the clock pendulum parts and components. Please use this as a glossary of the parts to a clock pendulum assembly. Knowing the correct terms for the various pendulum parts is helpful when locating replacements. We are pretty adept at deciphering descriptions of parts however knowing the name is always something we welcome.

The clock pendulum

First, a clock pendulum includes the bottom rating nut and threads, the pendulum bob, and top hook. Additionally, these items are removable on wood stick pendulums only. Lyre metal clock pendulums do not have the ability to come apart.

Clock pendulum leader

Second, a leader is the part that the pendulum hangs onto when it is installed on the clock. It then in turn hooks to the suspension spring on the very top of the pendulum assembly. Naturally, pendulum leaders vary depending on the manufacturer of the clock movement and they can also vary in length as well as style. Sometimes there can be more than one type of leader for the same movement. There are also instances where we custom make leaders for customers.

Suspension spring description

The clock pendulum suspension spring is the short spring steel part on the very top of the pendulum assembly. Its purpose is to suspend the leader and pendulum in the air. Generally speaking, its steel spring like strips flex to let the pendulum swing back and forth with ease and momentum.

Clock Pendulum Components Complete

In summary, the clock pendulum components description includes the pendulum hanging on the leader and the leader hanging on the suspension spring. Put the complete pendulum assembly on the clock and it is ready to go. The next step is to put the clock in beat and run the clock to see how the time keeping is.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Replacing Lost Pendulum Parts

By and large, replacing a lost pendulum part from its assembly is a process. It is more complicated than just matching up the broken pendulum part. Certainly, narrowing it down requires a different method than just observation. The following text will guide you through that process.

The lost pendulum

First, identify the movement manufacturer. This is the beginning step to identify a lost clock pendulum. This is done by getting the movement numbers off of the back plate of the movement itself. That is to say, it will not be in the manual that came with the clock. Moreover it will also not be on any stickers or the clock case. Match the movement number here to find out who made the movement. Finally, proceed to the pendulum page. This is the first step in replacing a lost pendulum as well as replacing lost pendulum parts.

Hermle Clock Movement Availability

Lost pendulum leader

The leader hooks to the suspension spring. The suspension spring is located at the top of the movement. The pendulum hangs onto the leader. All or some of these parts are what you need to order to replace lost pendulum parts. Again, the order of the parts is the suspension spring, the leader, then the pendulum.

If the leader is missing, identify who made the movement. Use the above information to correctly identify the movement so it is possible to replace the pendulum part. The leader possibilities are narrowed down considerably upon knowing who made the movement. This makes things much easier when replacing lost pendulum parts. After knowing the manufacturer, match the information to a leader shown on this page. In the final analysis, visually inspect the pendulum hook style, the crutch on the back of the movement, and the suspension hook. Finally, compare the components of the clock to the options in that manufacturer category to figure out the best one. Replacing lost pendulum part can be tricky however with these descriptions the task should be less daunting.

The lost suspension spring

First know that style A is the very most common suspension spring style in existence. Check the top of the pendulum leader and if there is a double hook on the end it will be style A required for the clock. Generally speaking, style A3 is used for large grandfather units, A2 for grandmother and wall clocks, and A1 for mantle clocks. Suspension spring are one of the easier parts to ascertain when replacing lost pendulum parts.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

The mechanical clock pendulum length

A pendulum clock without a pendulum is a shame for sure. Hence, getting the mechanical clock pendulum length correct does take some diving into the clock world. I there is no idea what pendulum it would take, this is a basic guide. Of course, this is a basic guide to narrow it down to the best pendulum for the clock. This will cover most situations, without special equipment to figure out the length.

The movement CM or PL stamp

On the back plate of the clock movement usually, there are some numbers and or letters for identification. Likewise, there may be an indication of how long the pendulum should be in the mix of these numbers. It may say CM or PL and this stands for centimeter or pendulum length. Subsequently, this would be the length where it should keep approximate time. Generally, this is measured in a few different ways usually dependent on country of origin.

Mechanical Clock Pendulum Length for German made movements

Most mechanical German made clock movements are easy to figure out the pendulum length. In essence, the numbers will let us know or the stamp will clearly state the CM or PL number. If it is German, keep in mind the CM length is not the actual pendulum length. Altogether, German units measure this length from the top of the clock movement, and this includes the three components of the pendulum all in one length, in centimeters. This length will include the pendulum itself, the leader that it hooks to, and the suspension spring on the top that the leader hooks on to, all in one CM measurement. To clarify, CM stands for centimeter and PL stands for pendulum length.

If no stamp try to convert

With no pendulum length stamped into the movement some added steps are involved. The numbers on the back plate will cross reference to the pendulum length required. The first step is to identify the manufacturer of the clock movement by using the movement numbers. The movement numbers indicate who actually manufactured the movement. Various clock retailers may have have their name stamped onto it, but the numbers are always true to the manufacturer.

Converting numbers to CM length

Moreover, some movements do not have an indication of the pendulum length on the back plate. The unit will have a number that would need to be found on this website first to find out what the correct CM length is for it.

Converted number example

Generally speaking, let's say that the movement has no CM stamp on the movement and only shows the Urgos number UW32319. Go to the identification page to look at the movement number examples. In this example, we see that it is a Urgos. Now it is possible to go to the Urgos page and find the number to see what the pendulum length is. In this example, the pendulum length would be 80cm, representing the full length with the size of the bob factored in.

German grandfather movements

Almost all grandfather clock movements are going to be German if made after 1950. The first thing we need to do is get the numbers off of the back plate of the movement. This is the only way, and we can't cheat by looking at the paperwork or clock case. It has to come right off the back of the clockworks. The manual and the sticker on the case is of no use to get the pendulum.

American clocks

The American mechanical clock movement manufacturers referred to the pendulum length as a "drop". The drop is the length of the pendulum from the hand shaft all the way down to the bottom of the pendulum rating nut threads. It is a different way of measuring the pendulum length then the German made way. Both ways are based on the smallest bob diameter bob. If the bob is larger or heavier, the length would be longer than what is stamped.

No luck

If everything fails for one reason or another, the best chance for a pendulum is the wood stick style. This is the only style of pendulum that can be easily modified because it can be chopped down. These types of clocks are usually antiques, or of Asian origin, and information such as pendulum length is simply not available. Sometimes it takes a good guess on where the manufacturer intended to have the bob sit.

To do it this way, it is only needed a pendulum with a stick that is way too long to begin with. Chop it, try it, chop it, try it. Each time slow, cut an inch and half off of the sticks length and hang it back on. It will only take a couple of times, and if starting way too long it can always go shorter.

Clock makers method for Mechanical Clock Pendulum Lengths

There is another way, its called setting the beat rate. This is a more involved way and usually just done by clock makers. It involves a beat detecting device that counts out the beats per hour, or the beats per minute. To do this, first figure out what the beat rate is supposed to be for that particular movement, and then keep adjusting the pendulum length until it keeps time. There are cell phone apps out there these days that will tell the beat rate and the cell phone will listen and say if the clock will keep time with that pendulum. Go longer or shorter until the phone says the beat rate is set.

Contacting us for help with Mechanical Clock Pendulum Lengths

Please email the movement numbers from the back plate, and explain what part is needed. The email address to send this information is [email protected] Pictures are welcomed but not required. If emailing pictures please include the back side of the clock movement where the markings are.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Timing a mechanical pendulum clock

Timing a mechanical pendulum clock is all about the overall pendulum length. Rarely has anything to do with the movement itself, unless the movement not geared to the proper length from the start. A mechanical clock is easy to time providing the correct pendulum. When the pendulum is correct for that particular movement it will hang on the leader and keep approximate time. The fine timing can be done only with the pendulum adjustment located at the very bottom. At the bottom of the bob is some adjustment threads and a nut. To turn the nut one way raises the bob and the other lowers it. A shorter pendulum will make the clock run faster. A longer pendulum makes the clock run slower.

Fine timing the clock

If the clock is timing slow, raise the pendulum bob by turning the nut at the bottom of the bob. If the clock is fast, do the same but lower the clock's pendulum bob instead. One full turn is somewhere around 1-2 minutes a day faster or slower.

If there is no more adjustment

If the bob is all the way up and its still too slow or fast, shorten either the pendulum or the leader it hangs on to correct.

A lyre pendulum that does not keep time with the bob all the way adjusted will need its length altered. It can be altered with the overall length by the pendulum itself or the leader it hangs onto. The leader is about 5 to 7 inches long and engages with the crutch on back of the movement. The leader is the part that the pendulum top hook will mount to. It is possible to shorten or lengthen the pendulum leader to put the clock in time range with some solder if needed. 1 3/4 inches is a good measurement to make one of these longer or shorter as needed, as this is the length of the threads at the bottom of the bob. So it will give a full timing adjustment range all over again and can go up or down as needed.

German pendulum length CM stamp

The pendulum length is overall and not just the pendulum itself. These German units measure there pendulum lengths from the top of the movement and all the way down. This will include the suspension spring, the leader and also the pendulum itself. This is based on a 4 1/2 inch bob diameter. Of course the larger the bob, the longer it will be beyond that CM stamp measurement.

Used to keep time, now does not

If the clock kept time in the past but now does not, it means a worn gear. The escape wheel is worn and it is advancing more than one tooth at a time. The escape wheel alone would be hard to find, and hard to replace both. The entire movement would be disassembled to replace this worn escape wheel if there is another one found that will work. The cost of having this done would be the same price as a new movement. There is no such thing as having a repair on a clock movement being better than a new movement.

The price would be about the same for a complete overhaul or a brand new one. First see if the clock movement is in production and available new. We do this by getting the numbers off of the back plate of the movement itself, right off of the brass. Please email and we will check the availability and quote for the new one. If the movement is not in production anymore, then a movement restoration is the only option. The movement can be shipped to Clockworks Attn Repair department for a beautiful restoration.

Mechanical Pendulum Clock Timing Issues - Conclusion

Fine timing of the clock is easy as seen. If the clock kept time in the past and now too fast, its time for a new movement and has nothing to do with the pendulum. A worn escape wheel is most likely the cause and a new unit would be less cost then a repair.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Clock Pendulum Suspension Spring

Naturally, suspension springs do not have to be exact in length. If the clock runs slow, simply raise the pendulum bob with the rating nut at the bottom. Likewise, if the clock is running fast then turn the rating nut to lower the pendulum bob.

Most common springs

By and large, suspension spring A is the most common style suspension spring. Of course, it is most likely the one by default. If the old suspension spring looks similar to this one then it is right. As a general rule of thumb, small mantle clocks take suspension A1, wall clocks and small grandmother units will take suspension A2. The A3 size is for grandfather clock units with a larger pendulum bob diameter. This size can also be seen on Grandmother clocks with larger bob diameters. The larger A3 is used with large bob diameters so the bob will not wobble front to back. If using a pendulum with a bob of 8 1/2 inch diameter or larger please order Suspension A3 for this reason.

Not as common

Urgos uses the single hook style as seen in picture suspension B. However suspension A was the very most common to use. Very old antique round movements mainly use Suspension C and Suspension D. These are mainly French clocks and US made units made prior to 1945.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020
For information on how to install a suspension spring click here

Clock Pendulum Leaders

Mechanical pendulum clock leaders for post 1950 movements. These leader will fit clock movements made in Germany after WW2. The first step to replace a lost leader is to visually match one to the old leader. If the leader does not match up to any of the ones listed, please email us. A picture is always helpful. Look to see if the leader needs a double hook or a hole top in order for it to mount to the suspension spring. Similarly, check the other end and notice that configuration as well. What is the required mount style for the pendulum to hang on the clock? In the middle section, what one will engage with the swinging crutch on the back of the movement? These are all important factors to consider when replacing the leader.

The length of the leader

If the leader is missing, however, there are some more steps to figure out what the leader length should be. Not all leaders have variable lengths and the ones that do are for Hermle and Kieninger clock movements only. Kieninger is easy. Those leaders only come in two lengths. Grandfather clocks by Kieninger take the 7 inch leader. Wall and mantle units take the shorter leader. Hermle leaders are much more involved. Determining which leader is the correct length for a Hermle is a process. The next section will describe the ones available.

Hermle leader lengths

A Hermle floor or wall clock will always take leader D or G. leader E is for a low bridge to a high bridge conversion on a Hermle grandmother clock. Therefore, this can be eliminated from the choices if a conversion is not being done. The next choice is leader F which is for mantle clocks. This one is also used to create custom pendulum lengths. Additionally, leader F and leader G are interchangeable. So if a custom leader G is needed, a leader F can be used in its place with an alternate length. Please email us with any questions about Hermle leaders.

Hermle Clock Movement Availability

Leader F for Hermle mantle

Usually mantle clocks with a Hermle clock movement will take leader F. In a situation where the leader is missing and the length is unknown, the following steps need to be taken. This will ensure that the correct leader length is chosen. First, use the CM number off of the back of the movement. This CM length is the pendulum length from the top of the movement all the way down to the bottom of the pendulum. It is not the length of the pendulum itself. Often times this measurement can be confusing. It is important to measure this correctly. Failure to do so will result in the clock not keeping proper time.

Second step, is to take this CM length and divide it by 2.54 to get the inch equivalent. Then subtract the length of the pendulum and the suspension spring length from this measurement. The measurement that is left is the length needed for leader F. There are 1 1/2 inches of thread at the bottom of the pendulum for fine adjustment. Because there is so much room for adjustment, this measurement does not have to be exact. If there wasn't any extra length then it would need to be more precise. However this is not the case so close is good enough.

If the leader is the wrong length

The timing of a clock is determined by the length of the pendulum and the weight of the pendulum bob. This can get a bit confusing for some people. The overall pendulum length is stamped on the back plate of the clock movement with a CM number. This CM stamp is the overall pendulum length from the top of the clock movement all the way down to the bottom of the rating nut. This is based on the smallest bob diameter. Subsequently, a wider pendulum bob will require a longer pendulum. Again, this can get a bit tricky. Please feel free to send an email with any questions. We will be glad to help.

Often enough a clock will either run too fast or too slow. If the pendulum is too long, the clock will run slow. On the other hand, if the pendulum is too short the clock will run too fast. In addition, the wrong leader length will also create problems with accuracy. This may or may not be corrected by raising the bob up or down. This is done by turning the rating nut below the bob. If all else fails, a different leader length may need to be purchased. Before shortening a pendulum it would be best to contact us to see if this is the best option. Cutting the pendulum is the last resort.

In Conclusion

As seen, this is not a cut and dry procedure. There are many factors that play into getting the correct combination so the clock will keep correct time. The correct leader is just one part of the whole process. Sometimes all it takes is a leader that is a bit longer or shorter to correct an issue. There are also times where we have custom made leaders for customers. Measuring is also important. No matter what situation it is we can surely find a solution. Don't ever hesitate to reach out and ask a question. Pictures are always good to send so we can see what exists now. Email is always the fastest way to contact us.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Clock Pendulum Top Hooks

Mechanical clock pendulum top hooks replace broken top hooks or to build a new pendulum. This is a nice alternative to replacing an entire clock pendulum if the top is broken or missing. The top hook is the very top of the pendulum that will enable the pendulum to hang on the leader. To clarify, the leader is the 4 to 7 inch long bar that drives the clock pendulum back and forth.

What they fit

In fact, most of the top hooks here fit German post WW2 mechanical pendulum clocks. There are some top hooks that are for or can be used on antique clocks also. It matters only that the pendulum can hang into the air onto the leader and be stable. Antique clock pendulums can use any one of these top hooks if it will do the job.

How to install

The top hook installation is by friction only. Bend the tabs over and use a punch and a hammer to secure it to the wood stick. Another way is to drill starter holes into the top hook and secure with screws or nails.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

Pendulum Suspension Spring Rods

Frequently needed pendulum suspension spring rods in 17 inch lengths. These suspension rods are cut, bent, and modified as needed for the pendulum to hang onto the clock. They replace the pendulum suspension rods that have worn out and has the spring steel broken. Customize these to fit an antique American made wall or mantle clock movements. Comes in a pack of three to help get the shape and bend perfect for the clock. The spring steel at the top of the pendulum rod is 11mm wide and 1 1/4 inches long. This suspension steel length is longer than anything needed, and must be shortened usually, on the customers end.


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